Special Episode – Embracing Uncertainty

Special Uncertainty
Embrace uncertainty for growth! Join Siebe Van Der Zee and Yi Wang in a special episode of 10 Lessons Learned as they delve into the power of uncertainty. Sweaty palms, trembling voices - familiar feelings, right? Dive deep into insightful conversations and wisdoms shared by distinguished guests. Unlock untapped potential from our treasure trove of lessons!

Subscribe with your favourite podcast app. 

About Your Hosts

Siebe Van Der Zee is President of Vanderzee & Associates, Executive Search & Coaching. He has served as an international management consultant for over 25 years. For 28 years, Siebe has served as Honorary Consul of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Arizona. He holds a Master’s Degree in International Management from Thunderbird School of Global Management and he is a current member of the International Leadership Council at GPEC (Greater Phoenix Economic Council).

Yi Wang is passionate about applying a risk lens and toolkit to a business challenge, making it meaningful to stakeholders so to make better decisions and achieve their success. Having lived the life of a 1st-generation migrant in Australia, Yi completed a hybrid education in accounting and IT and worked in professional service and many digital-first industries. Yi received countless support and advice generously given by others, so he is a strong believer in mentorship and its power to help young professionals to realise their potential. Outside of his professional life, Yi enjoys playtime with his family, reading and is studying towards professional qualifications in mental health and counselling. Since joining the #10lessonslearned team, Yi has re-energised the team and helped refine a marketing strategy to amplify the outreach of the wisdom we aspire to share.

Episode Notes

Intro 00:00
Certainty is just a mindless illusion 02:13
The Upper Limit Problem 03:28
Learn to be comfortable being uncomfortable.06:06
Run towards the fire. 09:22

Guests who’s wisdom we talk about:
Ellen Langer: watch episode 
Katie & Gay Hendricks: watch episode 
Bas Boorsma: watch episode 
Jim Carroll: watch episode 
Conrad Taylor: watch episode
Beng Yeoh: watch episode 
Jeffery Wang: watch episode
David Chalke: watch episode 

10 Lessons – Special – Embracing Uncertainty v2

[00:00:03] Siebe Van Der Zee: hello and welcome to a special episode of 10 Lessons Learned. During this program, we will try out a new format and dive into our archives of more than 100 episodes and more than 1000 lessons learned from our distinguished guests. We want to focus on specific big themes and wisdoms that have been shared by our guests.
[00:00:25] Siebe Van Der Zee: My name is Siebe van der Zee and I’m joined by my colleague Yi Wang. And today we are delving into the topic of embracing uncertainty. We hope you will enjoy this new short segment. There is still a lot of untapped value from our ever-growing library of 10 lessons learned. Let us know what you think.
[00:00:46] Siebe Van Der Zee: Alright, here we go. Embracing uncertainty. We all know that anxious feeling. Think about getting ready for a job interview or preparing yourself for a presentation to a large audience. What about handing over your resignation letter to your boss or perhaps signing over your house as collateral to fund a startup?
[00:01:09] Siebe Van Der Zee: These are all tough situations to be in, and they’re not just feelings. They can actually trigger a visible physiological response in us. For example, sweaty palms, shaky hands, a pounding heartbeat, and a trembling voice. As a result, feeling doubtful, uncertain, and perhaps feeling a little scared may actually happen.
[00:01:32] Siebe Van Der Zee: We’ve all been there, right?
[00:01:34] Yi Wang: Absolutely see, but you’re
[00:01:35] Yi Wang: describing me at the moment, appearing on the podcast with you for the first time. It is great talking to you, on this occasion. when it comes to uncertainty. Absolutely agree with you. we face this all the time in our lives.
[00:01:48] Yi Wang: We see it at a macro level. We see it in the community. you know, we see it at an individual level as well. It can feel big, it can feel small at times, but uncertainty feels like a, a such abstract concept. our guest, Harvard professor and the mother of Mindfulness, Dr. Ellen Langer, told us that certainty is just a mindless illusion.

[00:02:13] Certainty is just a mindless illusion.

[00:02:13] Ellen Langer: Everything is always changing. (watch episode)
[00:02:15] Ellen Langer: Everything looks different from different perspectives. Yes. At schools, podcasts, newspapers, magazines always give us information as if it’s absolute. And what happens is when you hold the world still, when it’s actually in flux, you end up with less control than you otherwise would have, even though the whole thing is designed in part to give you control.
[00:02:38] Ellen Langer: Uncertainty is a fact of life. If you embrace uncertainty and exploit the power of uncertainty, you’re going to be much more successful in all of your ventures. So when you’re taught something, so for example, I was taught horses don’t eat meat. Now, and it’s just a fact you accepted. But it turns out I was at this horse event.
[00:02:58] Ellen Langer: This man asked me would I watch his horse, when he goes and gets his horse, a hotdog, well, Harvard, Yale, all the way through, I’m thinking, you know, this is ridiculous. He brought back the hot dog and the horse ate it. And at that moment I realized that everything I thought I knew could be wrong.
[00:03:14] Yi Wang: As it was articulated by the legendary psychologist and life coach, Katie and Gay Hendrix, in what they called one central problem in life is the upper limit problem.

[00:03:28] The Upper Limit Problem

[00:03:28] Gay Hendricks: (watch episode) the upper limit problem is the one problem because wherever you find yourself getting stuck, you will find that that very thing.
[00:03:38] Gay Hendricks: If you open to it correctly is an invitation to your genius. So, for example, if I get stuck on something that some problem we’re having between me and Katie, the moment I can, you know, become transparent about it and communicate about it in a way that takes a hundred percent responsibility for it, suddenly this flow awakens, and I’ve seen it in boardrooms, and I’ve seen it a thousand times in the office here that people overcome whatever upper limit they are.
[00:04:11] Gay Hendricks: And they move immediately into that beautiful flow state that I’m calling genius. And so the direct effect of overcoming an upper limit problem is that it gives you a direct door into the creative essence of yourself and the universe.
[00:04:28] Yi Wang: I feel that, what they alluded to is that as humans, very much hardwired to prefer stability, Changes brings, a natural fear in us, you know, because we really don’t know what’s gonna happen, what’s going to come, we lose a sense of control, you know, even though that sense of control can be a, a false sense of control.
[00:04:48] Yi Wang: Yeah. So, as a starting point, I think what our guest told us is to be conscious about this natural cognitive limitation in us, before we start dealing with the situation is to recognize it.
[00:05:00] Siebe Van Der Zee: So perhaps the best way to deal with uncertainty is being counterintuitive. Trying to control anxiety can easily lead to more anxiety.
[00:05:13] Siebe Van Der Zee: We people suffer in vain because pressure, stress, and other mental challenges are typically unplanned and unexpected. They are external and they typically cannot be controlled or influenced by us human beings. One of our guests, professor Bas Boorsma, a well-known urban innovator and former Chief Digital officer with the city of Rotterdam. He told us in one of his lessons, learned to be comfortable.
[00:05:42] Siebe Van Der Zee: He talked about the fact that we’re living in an age where we see a major paradigm shift happening. The world around us is changing. The scale and pace of change is much greater than 20 or 30 years ago. That’s happening now, and we’re all part of it one way or another. We have to learn to become more comfortable with uncertainty and changing situations.

[00:06:06] Learn to be comfortable being uncomfortable.

[00:06:06] Bas Boorsma: (watch episode) I think currently Siebe, we’re living in an age where we see a major paradigm shift happened. The world around us is changing much more than saying the early nineties when I served in Cambodia. We are, we’re getting digitalized and things around us become more networks.
[00:06:23] Bas Boorsma: The old industrial age paradigm is /going out the window and you know what, Siebe? There is another kind of side lesson to that. But it doesn’t come from me, but I digest it and I can reproduce it, which is this when you’re living a major shift, like an industrial revolution type of shift, the past stops being a source of guidance for the present and future, which means that all the things that you could hold on to us in terms of certainties things that were relevant to you that were told to you may not be as relevant to guide you through the present and future.
[00:06:59] Bas Boorsma: And with that comes a level of discomfort. And this is something that all of us young and old we need to be, to grow comfortable with. We need to grow. We need to learn to be comfortable with being uncomfortable .
[00:07:11] Siebe Van Der Zee: From a different perspective. We just don’t know what will happen next. Most of the time, Jim Carroll (watch episode) a big name, big figure in the Australian media industry, told us in his lesson that our career path may not be what you think. Hmm. There’s a lot of serendipity, a lot of luck involved. So we have to keep an open mind.
[00:07:35] Yi Wang: Absolutely. I, I totally agree with, Jim and, and Bas there on, on their lessons learned. I think getting a little more comfortable with the situation is a fantastic way to look at it. you know, the problem’s not going away obviously, but. It’s really important that we hone a figure it out mindset.
[00:07:54] Yi Wang: You know, this is the lesson shared with us from Conrad Taylor, (watch episode) one of your guests, Siebe, a military and business veteran in his own right. And definitely he has gone through quite a lot in his own career. What he said really was that things will eventually pass one way or another.
[00:08:11] Yi Wang: we need to keep trying, we need to believe in that, you know, we’ll figure out something eventually, the solution may not be clear at the time, but there will be one. Right. You know, that’s the key point.
[00:08:23] Siebe Van Der Zee: I agree with Conrad. once we are ready to face up to the challenges ahead of us, we can actually start dealing with the situation at hand.
[00:08:33] Siebe Van Der Zee: We can never avoid the concept of resilience. Another guest, Beng Yeoh (watch episode) reminded us not to be afraid of making mistakes. It’s necessary for growth. There’s so much truth in that. Again, it may be hard to see when we are in the middle of dealing with stress, pressure, and yes, uncertainty. But as people advance in their careers and in their lives, it’s important to extract personal growth opportunities.
[00:09:01] Siebe Van Der Zee: From each of those challenges, and yes, that typically becomes so much more obvious in hindsight or taking it to another level. In the words of our colleague, co-host, and dear friend Jeffrey Wang, let’s be proactive and apply his lesson, run towards the fire.

[00:09:22] Run towards the fire.

[00:09:22] Jeffery Wang: (watch episode) the fact that, we need to run towards conflict because that anything that’s worth anything in life is worth the conflict.
[00:09:32] Jeffery Wang: And the other thing I’ve learned through throughout my years is that when we push conflict further down the road, it will only make it worse. Now this was a very, very hard lesson for me to learn because I grew up in a culture that is a very passive culture, is a very conflict avoiding culture, you know, in Asia people don’t say what they mean, because that’s what they’re taught, because that’s a way you avoid conflict in order to be able to live with each other.
[00:10:00] Jeffery Wang: And yes, it is, there is a cultural element of this. but as I learnt in the Western culture to run towards the conflict, I’ve realized that this is a much better way to live. Because what you get to is an understanding of each other that you would not otherwise have if you were just to avoid conflict.
[00:10:19] Yi Wang: Running towards the fire. That’s classic Jeff, isn’t it?
[00:10:21] Yi Wang: Siebe it’s definitely not easy to do. I suppose a gentler way to put it from a, different guest of our is David Chalke, (watch episode) is that he recommends us to be our own disruptor. you know, this is to actively seek out opportunities and challenges to grow. So, in Jeff’s analogy, we really need to have some, protective gear and fire extinguishers and whatnot before we start running towards the fire.
[00:10:48] Yi Wang: And metaphorically, these protector gear and the equipment that we’ve got are super important mindsets. Like you mentioned, the mindset of resilience. the mindset of having a can-do attitude, growth mindset, and also really importantly, a very healthy dose of self-belief as well.
[00:11:06] Yi Wang: So, thanks, Siebe. You I really enjoyed this short conversation with you today, and in this new format, I hope our audience likes it. the upshot of this topic that is embracing uncertainty is that, Being scared is a natural feeling that we all have When it happens. It really just means that we’re about to grow, we’re about to enter this growth phase.
[00:11:28] Yi Wang: So frequent discomfort, is really the price, of a accelerated growth. and, and we should embrace it. So on the topic of embracing uncertainty, these are the lessons learned that we drawn out from the library. you know, there’s obviously so much more than these lessons.
[00:11:44] Yi Wang: but here we are. I really hope, you like it.
[00:11:47] Siebe Van Der Zee: Well, thank you Yi. It’s, great to talk to you, and to our audience. You’ve been listening to a special episode of 10 Lessons Learned. The Mission of 10 Lessons learned is to focus on wisdom and permanent knowledge. It’s not so much about current affairs, the stock market or politics.
[00:12:05] Siebe Van Der Zee: No matter how relevant these issues are or may be, our goal is to capture the lessons from our guests and share them as far and wide as possible. I hope you enjoyed the show. We will include the guest names and the links to their lessons in the show notes. Please don’t forget to leave us a review or a comment.
[00:12:24] Siebe Van Der Zee: You can also email us at podcast 10 lessons learned.com. That is podcast at number ten one zero lessons learned.com. I hope you will subscribe so you don’t miss any future episodes. And remember, this is a podcast that makes the world wiser and wiser. Lesson by lesson. Thank you and stay safe.

 This episode is produced by Robert Hossary. Sponsored as always by Professional Development Forum. You can find the www.professionaldevelopmentforum.org you’ve heard from us we’d like to hear from you. Email us it’s podcast@10lessonslearned.com. Remember, this is the podcast the only podcast. That’s makes the world wiser lesson by lesson.

Special Uncertainty

Special Episode – Embracing Uncertainty

Embrace uncertainty for growth! Join Siebe Van Der Zee and Yi Wang in a special episode of 10 Lessons Learned as they delve into the power of uncertainty. Sweaty palms, trembling voices - familiar feelings, right? Dive deep into insightful conversations and wisdoms shared by distinguished guests. Unlock untapped potential from our treasure trove of lessons!

About Your Hosts

Siebe Van Der Zee is President of Vanderzee & Associates, Executive Search & Coaching. He has served as an international management consultant for over 25 years. For 28 years, Siebe has served as Honorary Consul of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Arizona. He holds a Master’s Degree in International Management from Thunderbird School of Global Management and he is a current member of the International Leadership Council at GPEC (Greater Phoenix Economic Council).

Yi Wang is passionate about applying a risk lens and toolkit to a business challenge, making it meaningful to stakeholders so to make better decisions and achieve their success. Having lived the life of a 1st-generation migrant in Australia, Yi completed a hybrid education in accounting and IT and worked in professional service and many digital-first industries. Yi received countless support and advice generously given by others, so he is a strong believer in mentorship and its power to help young professionals to realise their potential. Outside of his professional life, Yi enjoys playtime with his family, reading and is studying towards professional qualifications in mental health and counselling. Since joining the #10lessonslearned team, Yi has re-energised the team and helped refine a marketing strategy to amplify the outreach of the wisdom we aspire to share.

Episode Notes

Intro 00:00
Certainty is just a mindless illusion 02:13
The Upper Limit Problem 03:28
Learn to be comfortable being uncomfortable.06:06
Run towards the fire. 09:22

Guests who’s wisdom we talk about:
Ellen Langer: watch episode 
Katie & Gay Hendricks: watch episode 
Bas Boorsma: watch episode 
Jim Carroll: watch episode 
Conrad Taylor: watch episode
Beng Yeoh: watch episode 
Jeffery Wang: watch episode
David Chalke: watch episode 

10 Lessons – Special – Embracing Uncertainty v2

[00:00:03] Siebe Van Der Zee: hello and welcome to a special episode of 10 Lessons Learned. During this program, we will try out a new format and dive into our archives of more than 100 episodes and more than 1000 lessons learned from our distinguished guests. We want to focus on specific big themes and wisdoms that have been shared by our guests.
[00:00:25] Siebe Van Der Zee: My name is Siebe van der Zee and I’m joined by my colleague Yi Wang. And today we are delving into the topic of embracing uncertainty. We hope you will enjoy this new short segment. There is still a lot of untapped value from our ever-growing library of 10 lessons learned. Let us know what you think.
[00:00:46] Siebe Van Der Zee: Alright, here we go. Embracing uncertainty. We all know that anxious feeling. Think about getting ready for a job interview or preparing yourself for a presentation to a large audience. What about handing over your resignation letter to your boss or perhaps signing over your house as collateral to fund a startup?
[00:01:09] Siebe Van Der Zee: These are all tough situations to be in, and they’re not just feelings. They can actually trigger a visible physiological response in us. For example, sweaty palms, shaky hands, a pounding heartbeat, and a trembling voice. As a result, feeling doubtful, uncertain, and perhaps feeling a little scared may actually happen.
[00:01:32] Siebe Van Der Zee: We’ve all been there, right?
[00:01:34] Yi Wang: Absolutely see, but you’re
[00:01:35] Yi Wang: describing me at the moment, appearing on the podcast with you for the first time. It is great talking to you, on this occasion. when it comes to uncertainty. Absolutely agree with you. we face this all the time in our lives.
[00:01:48] Yi Wang: We see it at a macro level. We see it in the community. you know, we see it at an individual level as well. It can feel big, it can feel small at times, but uncertainty feels like a, a such abstract concept. our guest, Harvard professor and the mother of Mindfulness, Dr. Ellen Langer, told us that certainty is just a mindless illusion.

[00:02:13] Certainty is just a mindless illusion.

[00:02:13] Ellen Langer: Everything is always changing. (watch episode)
[00:02:15] Ellen Langer: Everything looks different from different perspectives. Yes. At schools, podcasts, newspapers, magazines always give us information as if it’s absolute. And what happens is when you hold the world still, when it’s actually in flux, you end up with less control than you otherwise would have, even though the whole thing is designed in part to give you control.
[00:02:38] Ellen Langer: Uncertainty is a fact of life. If you embrace uncertainty and exploit the power of uncertainty, you’re going to be much more successful in all of your ventures. So when you’re taught something, so for example, I was taught horses don’t eat meat. Now, and it’s just a fact you accepted. But it turns out I was at this horse event.
[00:02:58] Ellen Langer: This man asked me would I watch his horse, when he goes and gets his horse, a hotdog, well, Harvard, Yale, all the way through, I’m thinking, you know, this is ridiculous. He brought back the hot dog and the horse ate it. And at that moment I realized that everything I thought I knew could be wrong.
[00:03:14] Yi Wang: As it was articulated by the legendary psychologist and life coach, Katie and Gay Hendrix, in what they called one central problem in life is the upper limit problem.

[00:03:28] The Upper Limit Problem

[00:03:28] Gay Hendricks: (watch episode) the upper limit problem is the one problem because wherever you find yourself getting stuck, you will find that that very thing.
[00:03:38] Gay Hendricks: If you open to it correctly is an invitation to your genius. So, for example, if I get stuck on something that some problem we’re having between me and Katie, the moment I can, you know, become transparent about it and communicate about it in a way that takes a hundred percent responsibility for it, suddenly this flow awakens, and I’ve seen it in boardrooms, and I’ve seen it a thousand times in the office here that people overcome whatever upper limit they are.
[00:04:11] Gay Hendricks: And they move immediately into that beautiful flow state that I’m calling genius. And so the direct effect of overcoming an upper limit problem is that it gives you a direct door into the creative essence of yourself and the universe.
[00:04:28] Yi Wang: I feel that, what they alluded to is that as humans, very much hardwired to prefer stability, Changes brings, a natural fear in us, you know, because we really don’t know what’s gonna happen, what’s going to come, we lose a sense of control, you know, even though that sense of control can be a, a false sense of control.
[00:04:48] Yi Wang: Yeah. So, as a starting point, I think what our guest told us is to be conscious about this natural cognitive limitation in us, before we start dealing with the situation is to recognize it.
[00:05:00] Siebe Van Der Zee: So perhaps the best way to deal with uncertainty is being counterintuitive. Trying to control anxiety can easily lead to more anxiety.
[00:05:13] Siebe Van Der Zee: We people suffer in vain because pressure, stress, and other mental challenges are typically unplanned and unexpected. They are external and they typically cannot be controlled or influenced by us human beings. One of our guests, professor Bas Boorsma, a well-known urban innovator and former Chief Digital officer with the city of Rotterdam. He told us in one of his lessons, learned to be comfortable.
[00:05:42] Siebe Van Der Zee: He talked about the fact that we’re living in an age where we see a major paradigm shift happening. The world around us is changing. The scale and pace of change is much greater than 20 or 30 years ago. That’s happening now, and we’re all part of it one way or another. We have to learn to become more comfortable with uncertainty and changing situations.

[00:06:06] Learn to be comfortable being uncomfortable.

[00:06:06] Bas Boorsma: (watch episode) I think currently Siebe, we’re living in an age where we see a major paradigm shift happened. The world around us is changing much more than saying the early nineties when I served in Cambodia. We are, we’re getting digitalized and things around us become more networks.
[00:06:23] Bas Boorsma: The old industrial age paradigm is /going out the window and you know what, Siebe? There is another kind of side lesson to that. But it doesn’t come from me, but I digest it and I can reproduce it, which is this when you’re living a major shift, like an industrial revolution type of shift, the past stops being a source of guidance for the present and future, which means that all the things that you could hold on to us in terms of certainties things that were relevant to you that were told to you may not be as relevant to guide you through the present and future.
[00:06:59] Bas Boorsma: And with that comes a level of discomfort. And this is something that all of us young and old we need to be, to grow comfortable with. We need to grow. We need to learn to be comfortable with being uncomfortable .
[00:07:11] Siebe Van Der Zee: From a different perspective. We just don’t know what will happen next. Most of the time, Jim Carroll (watch episode) a big name, big figure in the Australian media industry, told us in his lesson that our career path may not be what you think. Hmm. There’s a lot of serendipity, a lot of luck involved. So we have to keep an open mind.
[00:07:35] Yi Wang: Absolutely. I, I totally agree with, Jim and, and Bas there on, on their lessons learned. I think getting a little more comfortable with the situation is a fantastic way to look at it. you know, the problem’s not going away obviously, but. It’s really important that we hone a figure it out mindset.
[00:07:54] Yi Wang: You know, this is the lesson shared with us from Conrad Taylor, (watch episode) one of your guests, Siebe, a military and business veteran in his own right. And definitely he has gone through quite a lot in his own career. What he said really was that things will eventually pass one way or another.
[00:08:11] Yi Wang: we need to keep trying, we need to believe in that, you know, we’ll figure out something eventually, the solution may not be clear at the time, but there will be one. Right. You know, that’s the key point.
[00:08:23] Siebe Van Der Zee: I agree with Conrad. once we are ready to face up to the challenges ahead of us, we can actually start dealing with the situation at hand.
[00:08:33] Siebe Van Der Zee: We can never avoid the concept of resilience. Another guest, Beng Yeoh (watch episode) reminded us not to be afraid of making mistakes. It’s necessary for growth. There’s so much truth in that. Again, it may be hard to see when we are in the middle of dealing with stress, pressure, and yes, uncertainty. But as people advance in their careers and in their lives, it’s important to extract personal growth opportunities.
[00:09:01] Siebe Van Der Zee: From each of those challenges, and yes, that typically becomes so much more obvious in hindsight or taking it to another level. In the words of our colleague, co-host, and dear friend Jeffrey Wang, let’s be proactive and apply his lesson, run towards the fire.

[00:09:22] Run towards the fire.

[00:09:22] Jeffery Wang: (watch episode) the fact that, we need to run towards conflict because that anything that’s worth anything in life is worth the conflict.
[00:09:32] Jeffery Wang: And the other thing I’ve learned through throughout my years is that when we push conflict further down the road, it will only make it worse. Now this was a very, very hard lesson for me to learn because I grew up in a culture that is a very passive culture, is a very conflict avoiding culture, you know, in Asia people don’t say what they mean, because that’s what they’re taught, because that’s a way you avoid conflict in order to be able to live with each other.
[00:10:00] Jeffery Wang: And yes, it is, there is a cultural element of this. but as I learnt in the Western culture to run towards the conflict, I’ve realized that this is a much better way to live. Because what you get to is an understanding of each other that you would not otherwise have if you were just to avoid conflict.
[00:10:19] Yi Wang: Running towards the fire. That’s classic Jeff, isn’t it?
[00:10:21] Yi Wang: Siebe it’s definitely not easy to do. I suppose a gentler way to put it from a, different guest of our is David Chalke, (watch episode) is that he recommends us to be our own disruptor. you know, this is to actively seek out opportunities and challenges to grow. So, in Jeff’s analogy, we really need to have some, protective gear and fire extinguishers and whatnot before we start running towards the fire.
[00:10:48] Yi Wang: And metaphorically, these protector gear and the equipment that we’ve got are super important mindsets. Like you mentioned, the mindset of resilience. the mindset of having a can-do attitude, growth mindset, and also really importantly, a very healthy dose of self-belief as well.
[00:11:06] Yi Wang: So, thanks, Siebe. You I really enjoyed this short conversation with you today, and in this new format, I hope our audience likes it. the upshot of this topic that is embracing uncertainty is that, Being scared is a natural feeling that we all have When it happens. It really just means that we’re about to grow, we’re about to enter this growth phase.
[00:11:28] Yi Wang: So frequent discomfort, is really the price, of a accelerated growth. and, and we should embrace it. So on the topic of embracing uncertainty, these are the lessons learned that we drawn out from the library. you know, there’s obviously so much more than these lessons.
[00:11:44] Yi Wang: but here we are. I really hope, you like it.
[00:11:47] Siebe Van Der Zee: Well, thank you Yi. It’s, great to talk to you, and to our audience. You’ve been listening to a special episode of 10 Lessons Learned. The Mission of 10 Lessons learned is to focus on wisdom and permanent knowledge. It’s not so much about current affairs, the stock market or politics.
[00:12:05] Siebe Van Der Zee: No matter how relevant these issues are or may be, our goal is to capture the lessons from our guests and share them as far and wide as possible. I hope you enjoyed the show. We will include the guest names and the links to their lessons in the show notes. Please don’t forget to leave us a review or a comment.
[00:12:24] Siebe Van Der Zee: You can also email us at podcast 10 lessons learned.com. That is podcast at number ten one zero lessons learned.com. I hope you will subscribe so you don’t miss any future episodes. And remember, this is a podcast that makes the world wiser and wiser. Lesson by lesson. Thank you and stay safe.

 This episode is produced by Robert Hossary. Sponsored as always by Professional Development Forum. You can find the www.professionaldevelopmentforum.org you’ve heard from us we’d like to hear from you. Email us it’s podcast@10lessonslearned.com. Remember, this is the podcast the only podcast. That’s makes the world wiser lesson by lesson.

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