Troy Hadeed – Everyone fails. Everyone succeeds. That’s what makes us the same

Troy Hadeed
Troy Hadeed is a Social Entrepreneur, Philosopher, Yoga Teacher, Author. He explains why ”Privilege is not a bad word”, why you should “Cultivate a loving relationship with your mind”, how “Forgiveness does not depend on an apology” and much more. Hosted by Robert Hossary.

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About Troy Hadeed

Troy Hadeed was born in Trinidad & Tobago and has lived there for the majority of his life, today he still calls the forested North Coast of Trinidad his home and lives among a community of hummingbirds.

He attended the University of Tampa in Florida and graduated with a degree in business. After that Troy returned to Trinidad to open Trinidad’s first Hemp store, which he ran for eight years before starting a biofuel business, and then finally nurturing a beautiful yoga studio and community known as One Yoga Trinidad—recently rebranding as BeyondYogaTv.com

Troy has traveled the world on a ship, walked on foot across Costa Rica, sat in silence for 10 days at a time, spent time in absolute darkness, and has dedicated the last 15 years of his life to the practice and teaching of Yoga. He has recently completed his first book, Popcorn in My Pocket; Insightful Reflections For A Better You & A Better World, scheduled to launch in 2023

Episode Notes

Lesson 1: Do you disagree or are you avoiding having the conversation? 04:38
Lesson 2: Nurture a personal relationship with (your) GOD & allow others to nurture theirs. 08:16
Lesson 3: Forgiveness does not depend on an apology. 15:08
Lesson 4: Hope & Faith are not the same and do not carry the same power. 20:15
Lesson 5: Privilege is not a bad word 29:32
Lesson 6: The most valuable currency on the planet is our support, attention, and love. 30:23
Lesson 7: Everyone fails. Everyone succeeds. That’s what makes us the same. 34:43
Lesson 8: Stop asking the question, “How can I change the world?” – Have the courage to ask, “How am I changing the world?” 39:49
Lesson 9: Cultivate a loving relationship with your mind. 44:29
Lesson 10: Breathing is not something we do, but something that is done to us 50:11

Troy Hadeed – Everyone fails. Everyone succeeds. That’s what makes us the same

[00:00:08] Robert Hossary: Hello and welcome to 10 Lessons Learned, where we talk to sages and gurus, leaders in luminaries from all over the world to dispense their wisdom for your career, business and life. To make the world a wiser place, lesson by lesson.

[00:00:25] Robert Hossary: My name is Robert Hossary and I’m your host for this episode. 

[00:00:30] Robert Hossary: Today’s guest is Troy Hadeed. Troy was born in Trinidad and Tobago, and has lived there the majority of his life. Today, he still calls the forested north coast of Trinidad, his home and lives amongst the community of hummingbirds. I love that. A community of hummingbirds.

[00:00:50] Robert Hossary: I would love to live in the community of hummingbirds. He attended the University of Tampa in Florida and graduated with a degree in business. 

[00:00:59] Robert Hossary: After that, Troy returned to Trinidad and opened Trinidad’s first hemp store, which he ran for eight years before starting a biofuel business, and then finally nurturing a beautiful yoga studio and community known as One Yoga Trinidad.

[00:01:15] Robert Hossary: They have recently rebranded into https://beyondyogatv.com/. I urge you to check that out. Troy has traveled the world in a ship. He’s walked on foot across Costa Rica. He sat in silence for 10 days at a time. He spent time in absolute darkness and has dedicated the last 15 years of his life to the practice and teaching of yoga.

[00:01:43] Robert Hossary: He has recently completed his first book, Popcorn in My Pocket, Insightful Reflections for A Better You and a Better World. And that’s scheduled to be released in 2023. Welcome, Troy. Thanks for being on the show today. 

[00:01:59] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, thanks. Robert. It’s an absolute pleasure and an honor to be here.

[00:02:03] Robert Hossary: You have a very diverse background, if I can use that. You’ve done a lot of things, many of us dream about. it must have given you a lot of experiences to fall back on and a lot of teachings that you are going to share with us today. 

[00:02:18] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. You know, it’s been quite a journey when I look at it and, none of it was a coincidence.

[00:02:23] Troy Hadeed: No part of it at all, you know, from my early childhood and all the circumstances that allowed me the privilege of these experiences. I think, we all very, very much planned, you know, no coincidence involved at all. 

[00:02:37] Robert Hossary: All right, let’s jump straight into it. Let me ask, let me start this off by asking you, one of our standard questions.

[00:02:44] Robert Hossary: Troy, if you had the opportunity, what would you tell your 30 year old self? 

[00:02:49] Troy Hadeed: You know, there’s,there’s a quote I recently tattooed on my arm and I wish I had come across it and understood it decades ago. And I don’t even know who the author is, cuz every time I Google it or research it, I see an unknown author.

[00:03:09] Troy Hadeed: So I can’t even cite this author. But it’s a reminder. It says I have not come to teach, I have come to Love and Love will teach, and I’ll repeat that. It says I have not come to teach, I have come to Love and Love will teach. And I think a lot of the time, you know, we get so caught up in teaching or proving our point that we create separation and otherness and we make people feel judged and disconnected.

[00:03:39] Troy Hadeed: And I like to say that if we really want to create change in a world or create change in someone, we first have to understand their perspective and then go through their perspective to create that change. We can’t try to force them through our perspective. 

[00:03:57] Robert Hossary: There’s too many people in the world that will not understand what you just said, Troy.

[00:04:02] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:04:02] Robert Hossary: There are too many people who want to force their perspective, and their values on you. Yeah. so I love that lesson because it actually means something to me. So that’s actually very powerful. And I’ll say to our audience, 

[00:04:19] Robert Hossary: today’s episode will be a little more philosophical than you may be used to, but please listen to these lessons and see how they can apply them into your daily life. Because what Troy is bringing to us today are very powerful lessons.

[00:04:38] Lesson 1:Do you disagree or are you avoiding having the conversation?

[00:04:38] Robert Hossary: So let’s get started. Okay, Troy, lesson number one.

[00:04:42] Robert Hossary: Do you disagree or are you avoiding the conversation? 

[00:04:47] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, so you know, they said this. It’s so convenient that this is lesson number one, because you know, it builds on what you just said. And very often our dismissal is actually our avoidance. And it’s easy to look at a teaching or perspective or anything really and say, that does not apply to me.

[00:05:12] Troy Hadeed: But it’s important to ask the question, how does it apply? Because everything applies. Everything applies. And I remember, you know, a story that comes to me about this, it’s, I remember one of my teachers wanted, her name was Sean Cohen. She’s such a phenomenal teacher. And I can’t quote her words exactly cuz it would make her sound like really mean, but she’s not.

[00:05:37] Troy Hadeed: But I’ll tell you how it landed for me. And how I interpreted her words was her telling me that I was wrong, I was the source of only misalignment in the world. And that hit me hard because I knew I was trying my best for decades to live from a place of love and be an alignment. But what I wasn’t looking at was all the areas of my life in which I was out of alignment.

[00:06:04] Troy Hadeed: So I was conveniently looking at all the light, all the places in my life in which I was living from a place of love. I did not create the time and space in my own life to look at the areas of disconnect, the areas of misalignment, the areas in which I showed up from a place of judgment or greed or otherness or separation.

[00:06:26] Troy Hadeed: And it’s important that we ask that question, how does this apply to my life? Because. Our growth and transformation Robert lives in our disconnect and our misalignment. Our growth and transformation doesn’t live any places where we live from a place of light and love. You know, it lives in a darkness and we have to look at that darkness.

[00:06:50] Robert Hossary: That is that, that is very powerful. I mean, what I heard and my business brain translates it into business speak. You can only grow through your failures, you can only grow through learning what your mistakes are and becoming better at those things that you were not good at. And that’s what I hear you say that yeah, those areas of misalignment, those areas of disconnect in your life are the areas where you should improve.

[00:07:22] Robert Hossary: And as you improve, you will grow. 

[00:07:25] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. But you have to see them first. 

[00:07:27] Robert Hossary: You have to see them. and that is the biggest challenge. It’s a skill that everybody can develop if they want to and everything. And I believe everything in your lesson, lessons coming up, all come back to self-awareness. 

[00:07:47] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:07:48] Robert Hossary: You must be able to look in the mirror and see the person looking back at you.

[00:07:54] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:07:55] Robert Hossary: That is so important. You can’t look in the mirror and just see what you think you want to see. That’s a fantastic lesson. Look,I think that’s great. And again, I’m. I’m gonna try not to get too philosophical here, because I can talk to you forever, Troy. I mean, yeah, I’m just on the same page as you.

[00:08:16] Lesson 2:Nurture a personal relationship with (your) GOD & allow others to nurture theirs. 

[00:08:16] Robert Hossary: Alright, let’s move to lesson number two. Nurture a personal relationship with your God and allow others to nurture theirs. That seems pretty straightforward. 

[00:08:28] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, 

[00:08:29] Troy Hadeed: doesn’t it? but we’re not, we haven’t done it for decades, Robert, and this, this lesson is probably one of the closest to my heart because one of my friends and someone I teach with, he says to me, dude, every second word out of your mouth is either love or God

[00:08:47] Troy Hadeed: So if someone is not okay with the word God, then chances are they’re not going to be very receptive to what I bring. But I’ll say it like this, for decades, even centuries maybe we have been told what God is, what God looks like and what God wants of us. God was even given an agenda. And for anyone who really connects to any aspect of God, we have to look at the historical wrongs and misalignments and oppression that have been done in the name of God.

[00:09:26] Troy Hadeed: So for me, Robert, once somebody tells me they don’t believe in God or they’re an atheist, I understand, I completely understand why somebody would want not to associate with God, but I would urge someone not to allow history to rob us of that relationship, the divinity. Because it is our right and it is the one thing that connects all of us, connects all of creation.

[00:10:00] Troy Hadeed: And if we cannot relate to some aspect of divinity, call it God, call it whatever you like, if we cannot relate to it, then it feeds our separateness, our otherness. And from that, that to me is a source of all misalignment and world, this narrative that we are separate, we are different, we are other. You know, it’s so ironic that historically, most, I can’t say all, most of the understandings of God are exclusive to one group of people or one group of understanding.

[00:10:40] Troy Hadeed: They aren’t inclusive. And that, to me, is the biggest red flag. God, divinity, whatever you want to call it, it’s okay with me. it’s your relationship to God, but it is inclusive. And I think historically the problem with people being told what God is, what God looks like and what God wants is it blocks that personal relationship to God.

[00:11:08] Troy Hadeed: And I believe that divinity communication speaks to every individual, but we just haven’t been given the tools to sit and listen. 

[00:11:18] Robert Hossary: That is very deep. Troy I’m not dismissing what you’re saying. I’m not disagreeing with what you’re saying. I’m still struggling to. Fully understand what you’re saying.

[00:11:31] Robert Hossary: I understand the fact that you’re saying whatever you call it, you know, whether it be God, whether it be mother Nature, whether it be Gaia, whether it be the universe, what, whatever. I get it. Yeah. I understand that if I can paraphrase what I think you said and you can correct me. 

[00:11:49] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, sure. 

[00:11:49] Robert Hossary: If we all take the time to connect to the belief that we have, that we are all the same, and that this planet that we are on is our home, then we can all share in that wonder of the life that is created on this planet.

[00:12:13] Robert Hossary: and the beauty, therein. I know this sounds pretty deep and maybe to a lot of our audience, you know, like, you know, a bit out there, but stop and think about it. What I’m hearing from you, Troy, is if we all connect with each other, then we can live a little more peacefully. We can live a little more in love as opposed to in hate, which is what I am seeing far too much of.

[00:12:45] Robert Hossary: I mean, yeah. Am I off the mark here? 

[00:12:46] Troy Hadeed: no. Very, just different words. You know, we all use different words and you are definitely on a mark. And you know, in any tradition of yoga, we, you know, there’s this word that’s thrown around now, it’s called namaste, come from Indian heritage, right? And the word namaste, you know, we use it very gimmicky, but the word namaste means that the God light in me, acknowledges God within you.

[00:13:15] Troy Hadeed: And to me, I extend that to all living things. to use that word, is to acknowledge that we are all God. And you know, a cool story of when this really landed. Is that the very first night I, you know, I live in a forest and I lived in a tree house for six years, but I make it very clear to people that I didn’t grow up in a forest or jungle, like I’m a city boy, right?

[00:13:41] Troy Hadeed: I’m not like this butch survivor man. so my first night in this treehouse alone was very challenging. And, you know, I was there alone. I could scream and no one would hear me. And you have all the noises and animals and creatures, every forest coming out. And I was so threatened. But there was a moment when I took a few breaths and I relaxed into it, and I realized that I felt threatened because I saw myself as separate.

[00:14:16] Troy Hadeed: And as long as I saw myself as separate, I was a threat. Not only did I feel threatened, but I became a threat that everything else was, that was around me, right? Because I would do anything to protect my identity and myself. And, in that moment, Robert, I saw these giant trees. I saw a moon glistening on the leaves of trees.

[00:14:44] Troy Hadeed: I began to see all the magnificence around me, whereas before that all I could feel was threatened and scared. 

[00:14:54] Robert Hossary: That’s very, very deep. Troy. I hear you and I understand what you’re saying and yeah, I love that. All I can say is wow. Let’s move on to the next one because as I said, I can sit at your feet and listen for hours.

[00:15:08] Lesson 3:Forgiveness does not depend on an apology. 

[00:15:08] Robert Hossary: But let’s move on to lesson number three, which by the way, is probably, one of my favorites. Lesson number three, forgiveness does not depend on an apology. Yeah. How true is that? 

[00:15:23] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, of course. And we, I’ve heard that before and we say that before, but I don’t think, you know, we say a lot of things, Robert, without really understanding them or breaking them down, or realizing how they apply to our lives.

[00:15:39] Troy Hadeed: So I like to try to break these things down. So I define forgiveness as believing someone can be better and do better even when they don’t realize how, or they don’t even realize they need to be better. So it’s important to me to acknowledge that every single individual is a product of their conditioning and their experiences.

[00:16:06] Troy Hadeed: If their conditioning was negative, was full of fear, if they’ve never felt secure, then that breeds certain characteristics within someone, and it’s important to really put a finger on that because once we see one another as a product of our conditioning and experiences, then it’s almost like we have a responsibility to help someone dissolve or overcome negative conditioning and negative experiences.

[00:16:41] Troy Hadeed: But we have to see beyond that conditioning and acknowledge that it is not below that. Conditioning is a child of God. And that is what we need to see. We need to see beyond that narrative to the child, the soul of God that lives within every individual. And I believe on some level, you know, I can’t answer any questions, no one can, but on some level we’ve come here as human beings in this experience to help one another move through all of this conditioning.

[00:17:14] Robert Hossary: So true. so true. However, and while I absolutely agree with that, yeah. As a human being that is a product of the conditioning of the society I, I live in and that I’ve grown up in. , as much as I want to forgive someone, I find it bloody hard to forgive them. There are people who I agree with you.

[00:17:38] Robert Hossary: The people who have crossed me are not inherently evil people, so I agree with that. Absolutely. I just find it really difficult to get to the point where I can just forgive them and help them overcome that. How would you suggest one goes about doing that? 

[00:18:00] Troy Hadeed: Well, I’m trying not to jump ahead to lessons here, but they’re also interconnected, right?

[00:18:06] Troy Hadeed: So I will say this Robert, I’ll give a little story and then I’ll explain, take a mosquito for instance, if a mosquito bites you Someone might squash the mosquito and feel really attacked. And then I would ask you a question, well, are you mad at a mosquito? And they might say, well, yes, the mosquito bit me.

[00:18:29] Troy Hadeed: And while the mosquito may have bit you intentionally knowing it was going to bite you and knowing it was gonna cause you harm, that’s all a mosquito knows how to do. That’s all it’s ever been taught. So it wasn’t a personal attack. It’s not that the mosquito is out to get Robert, the mosquito just wants blood, needs blood.

[00:18:57] Troy Hadeed: And Robert happens to be in its way. So Robert gets bitten. So I think we’re all. Sometimes we’re casualties in this human experience in which we all had to learn to love and try to make it all unfold. But I think what makes forgiveness really hard is when we attach to our personal identity, our body, and name and form, because then anything that is done to us, we take, as a personal attack, even if somebody disagrees with us, we take it as a personal attack because our identity is so caught up in this individual narrative of body and form.

[00:19:42] Troy Hadeed: You know? 

[00:19:43] Robert Hossary: That is so true. and I think that is how one handles it by not taking it as a personal attack. Yeah. And understanding what you said. I will give lots of thought on that and I will, I, I commit to you, I will improve . 

[00:20:01] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. I do think, Robert, that once we get our head around this, forgiveness is not an option.

[00:20:08] Troy Hadeed: It’s inevitable. 

[00:20:10] Robert Hossary: Yes. Yes. I see that and I understand that. Okay. 

[00:20:15] Lesson 4:Hope & Faith are not the same and do not carry the same power. 

[00:20:15] Robert Hossary: Let’s go to lesson number four, which again, is a very powerful lesson and I love it. But lesson number four, hope and faith are not the same and they do not carry the same power. 

[00:20:27] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. I love all of these actually. I had, I had fun with it, Robert.

[00:20:32] Troy Hadeed: I felt like I could have written about a hundred lessons and I really had to narrow them

[00:20:38] Troy Hadeed: So we often refer to hope and faith as interchangeable. Whether we realize it or not, we use them interchangeably and then not hope carries doubt, uncertainty, unknowing, a lack of confidence. This is what hope is.

[00:20:57] Troy Hadeed: I’m not saying hope, it’s a bad thing. Hope is beautiful, but we must know the difference. Faith, there’s no room for doubt. There’s no room for uncertainty. Faith is an absolute knowing. An absolute knowing. I was saying to someone the other day, faith is not religious. Faith does not belong to religion.

[00:21:22] Troy Hadeed: It is not even tied to God. We believe in God. We believe in divinity because of faith. Faith has to come first. Faith is the knowing that we are part of a larger intelligence, that there is something happening. This is what faith is. So faith does not mean that we are clairvoyant or we can predict the future.

[00:21:51] Troy Hadeed: That’s not what faith is. Lemme draw an example here with hope. If I hope something can happen and it doesn’t happen the way I wanted it to, then I feel defeated. You know, I feel down and I feel like a failure. But with faith now, if I have faith instead of hope, when things don’t happen as I hoped or I intended, Then I have faith that there is a larger intelligence at play.

[00:22:25] Troy Hadeed: That there is something happening for me to learn, or that I am being used in a way, or that this experience is being used in a way to bring someone else growth and transformation or my self growth and transformation. So with that faith, I am able to maybe retreat and reflect and then realize that maybe there’s another way to bring about what I want to bring about or maybe I need to go in a different direction altogether.

[00:23:01] Troy Hadeed: But hope and faith are very different things. The way I describe it is like hope is dreaming. Hope creates these dreams, but hope can’t get us there. Faith gets us there and faith can manifest dreams larger than we ever hoped. 

[00:23:23] Robert Hossary: That is wonderful. I’m, that is very deep too. everything that you are saying, I have to go back and listen and I’ll actually say this to our audience.

[00:23:33] Robert Hossary: Go back and listen to all this again, because just hearing it once might not be enough. I know it’s not enough for me. but I do understand your definition of both and I agree with them. They are two totally different things. and I think I have stopped hoping things happen and in a business sense for me anyway.

[00:23:55] Troy Hadeed: Yeah.

[00:23:55] Robert Hossary: I don’t hope that my strategies work. I have faith that they’ll work because I’ve researched them. I know what’s going to happen. I know how it should happen, and if it doesn’t happen the way that it’s planned, then I make an alteration. 

[00:24:11] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:24:12] Robert Hossary: You know, you can’t just sit back and go, oh, that didn’t work. Oh, I hope it will come back. It’s not going to. 

[00:24:19] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. And from an entrepreneurial standpoint to Robert, it’s like, I don’t know if you can relate, but from a business standpoint, what I’ve found is that when you put one foot forward and keep one foot back, things don’t generally happen. , 

[00:24:37] Robert Hossary: you don’t go anywhere 

[00:24:38] Troy Hadeed: you don’t go anywhere.

[00:24:39] Troy Hadeed: You have to commit with both feet 100% to,

[00:24:45] Robert Hossary: And that is faith. 

[00:24:46] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. You have to be willing to risk it all. 

[00:24:50] Robert Hossary: Yep. 

[00:24:50] Troy Hadeed: And know that if it doesn’t work out, there’s something else. 

[00:24:54] Robert Hossary: Yep. 

[00:24:54] Troy Hadeed: You’re gonna find your feet. 

[00:24:55] Robert Hossary: what a wonderful analogy to put it back into our business sense. Brilliant. Love it. 

[00:25:00] Lesson 5:Privilege is not a bad word

[00:25:00] Robert Hossary: Alright, let’s move to lesson number five.

[00:25:04] Robert Hossary: So Troy, lesson number five. Privilege is not a bad word. 

[00:25:09] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. You know, I grew up, Robert, I always say I come from a place of privilege in so many ways. I can even count my privilege, right? Sometimes when we think of privilege, we think of the larger labels of privilege, and I am light-skinned. I come from a well off financial family.

[00:25:30] Troy Hadeed: I am straight. I am physically well able. I can go on and on and on about all the privilege, larger labels of privilege that I benefit from.

[00:25:41] Troy Hadeed: And we talk a lot about these larger labels of privilege, but let me say first that I grew up being ashamed of my privilege as a child and in young adolescents, right?

[00:25:55] Troy Hadeed: I didn’t wanna tell people my name. I didn’t wanna tell people what neighborhood I lived in because I didn’t want to be seen as separate or other, or stsh or spoiled. But what I realized is that if I did not own my privilege, my privilege owned me. And what I mean by that is if I hid from my privilege, the only person who was gonna benefit was me and my inner circles and my family.

[00:26:26] Troy Hadeed: But if I could own my privilege and let go of the shame and guilt that might exist around privilege, I could then use my privilege to serve something greater than myself. To serve the larger collective and to even sometimes dissolve these circumstances, that created my privilege in the first place. 

[00:26:51] Troy Hadeed: Or at least try to, and when I talk about privilege, I have to mention that the largest privilege in our world, the most powerful privilege in our world, and the one that is spoken of least of all, is the privilege of knowing what it means to be loved.

[00:27:09] Troy Hadeed: And this comes back to conditioning and experiences, right? We take it for granted that everyone has someone to nurture them, to teach them right from wrong, to love them, to make them feel secure and safe. But that’s not true at all. The majority of people have never known that. And, it’s important to own that privilege if none others, because it’s easier to look at someone and say, you should know better, do better.

[00:27:42] Troy Hadeed: But what if they were never shown how to grow up in a life where you never feel safe or secure, you never felt like you were part of the collective? Then how can you actually care for the collective if you never felt like you were part of it? 

[00:27:59] Robert Hossary: That is so true,in so many different ways. very powerful stuff.

[00:28:05] Robert Hossary: Very powerful stuff. And you’re right, privilege is not a bad word as long as everybody understands that either they were privileged in certain areas or in their whole life, or they weren’t. But it is something that we must own. It’s something that we must say. I’m, I say, the same as you. I was lucky enough to have food on the table, to have a roof over my head, to have clothes on my back that would be provided to me by my family.

[00:28:38] Robert Hossary: That is a privilege. 

[00:28:40] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:28:41] Robert Hossary: Yeah. 

[00:28:41] Robert Hossary: So I see how all your lessons fit into each other, and I’m, yeah.

[00:28:45] Robert Hossary: I’m just having a wonderful time. This is an awakening for me, Troy. Thank you. 

[00:28:51] Troy Hadeed: Beautiful. And I would say on that note Robert, I know we have limited time on each one of these lessons could probably take an hour in itself. 

[00:28:58] Robert Hossary: I would love to do a podcast on each lesson. Yes. 

[00:29:01] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. But, for listeners, like the fact that you are listening to this podcast you’re privileged.

[00:29:08] Robert Hossary: Yeah. 

[00:29:09] Troy Hadeed: You know, a privilege, an advantage. And sometimes we get so caught up in the ways in which we are not privileged. Yeah. And not advantage that we forget to look at the areas in our life in which we are privileged. And once we can own that comes with a responsibility. 

[00:29:27] Robert Hossary: What an excellent lesson.

[00:29:29] Robert Hossary: What an excellent lesson. Alright, Troy, 

[00:29:32] Affiliate Break

[00:29:32] Robert Hossary: I’m gonna take a very quick break. We’d like to thank our affiliate partner Audible. Audible is an amazing way to consume 10 lessons learned books and other podcasts, allowing you to build a library. Of knowledge all in one place. You can start your free 30 day trial by going to audible trial.com/ten.

[00:29:55] Robert Hossary: Lessons Learned with Audible, you can find your favorite lesson while at home or on the gutter. Once again, that’s audible trial.com/one zero. Lessons learned for a free 30 day trial. The link will be in the show notes. 

[00:30:13] Robert Hossary: Our guest today is Troy Hadeed. He’s a yoga teacher and author, a social entrepreneur, and we’re proud and privileged to have him with us here today. 

[00:30:23] Lesson 6:The most valuable currency on the planet is our support, attention, and love. 

[00:30:23] Robert Hossary: So, Troy, let’s move on to lesson number six. The most valuable currency on the planet is our support, attention and love.

[00:30:36] Robert Hossary: Tell me about that. 

[00:30:37] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. You know, We often think of currency, Robert, as money. And when we think of corruption, we think of politics, big business, millions and billions of dollars being shuffled around in exchange for services and support. And while I understand that our relationship to our society produced the people who are now, in corruption or in corrupt circles, and we have to ask a question, well, where did that come from?

[00:31:13] Troy Hadeed: So what I like to point out is every day we participate in corruption. Every single day, each one of us, because the most valuable thing we can give each other is our attention, our support, and our love. And generally, if people don’t act in a manner that pleases us, we withdraw our support and withdraw our love.

[00:31:44] Troy Hadeed: Or energetically we give them a cold shoulder. Cold shoulder or a silent treatment. We do this in relationships, in marriages, in friendships, in a workplace. We do it everywhere. This is corruption. We are just trading emotional support. We are trading love. We are trading our attention. Imagine that as kids.

[00:32:10] Troy Hadeed: We, we, we bribe our kids. Stop crying, I’ll buy you ice cream. That is a bribe. That is corruption. Rather than explaining to a child trying to understand why they are crying and trying to make them feel safe, we bribe them. And so I understand, right? If we grow up in a society where emotionally we’re trading this currency of love and attention and support, all of a sudden I’m an adult.

[00:32:44] Troy Hadeed: I’m in politics, so I’m ahead of this corporation, with billions of dollars at my disposal. Why not? It’s normal. I’ve been doing it my whole life. Society does it. So, as much as we want to start to remove corruption from politics and big business and our world, we have to start to look at the currency we are trading every day in our lives.

[00:33:12] Robert Hossary: That is incredibly confronting. Troy and I will, I’ll speak on behalf of myself and probably the entire audience that is incredibly confronting, to sit back and say, well, I’m a good person. And then hear what you’ve just said and think, well, yeah, I’ve done that, and I’m not disagreeing with you.

[00:33:37] Robert Hossary: It is, I can see the definition there. I can understand that the trading of emotions, the trading of love, the trading of affection for something else for obedience. 

[00:33:52] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:33:53] Robert Hossary: Most of the time is corruption. I can see that. I’m just stunned that I haven’t seen that before. 

[00:34:01] Troy Hadeed: it, yeah. 

[00:34:02] Robert Hossary: that is confronting.

[00:34:04] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. It’s hard. It’s hard. And we all do it.

[00:34:07] Robert Hossary: It’s very hard. 

[00:34:07] Troy Hadeed: we all do it. Even to this day I do it. But again, you can only bring light to something when you see it and you start to look at it. 

[00:34:16] Robert Hossary: Well, we hope that we brought light to our audience. you definitely shone a spotlight for me. I will definitely be looking at the way I deal with that, personally, 

[00:34:27] Troy Hadeed: And I just wanna add, Robert, you know, some people might hear this and like, feel like they can’t challenge anyone or they can’t, we can.

[00:34:35] Troy Hadeed: It’s called conversation. It’s called being vulnerable and expressing how we feel or how something makes us feel. 

[00:34:43] Lesson 7:Everyone fails. Everyone succeeds. That’s what makes us the same. 

[00:34:43] Robert Hossary: let’s go to lesson number seven.

[00:34:46] Robert Hossary: Everybody fails. Everybody succeeds and that’s what makes us the same. Tell me about that. 

[00:34:55] Troy Hadeed: You know, when I talk about this, I really talk about our humanness and allowing everyone else their humanness. And I think this is important because we often want to allow ourselves humanness and understand that we will make mistakes.

[00:35:16] Troy Hadeed: Or for some people maybe not, but we fail to allow everyone else their humanness as well. And understand that we are all here. None of us are here because we have it figured out. If we had it figured out, we probably would not be in our physical body. To my understanding. And I think it’s important to allow our humanness, because I also connect this to accountability

[00:35:46] Troy Hadeed: We want more accountability in our world. We always talk about that, but yet we don’t create a space in which people feel comfortable being accountable. So every time somebody is accountable and says It was me, we hang them. We chastised them, we punish them. So who wants to be accountable? We’re not making accountability accessible.

[00:36:15] Troy Hadeed: To me, when someone steps into a place of accountability, it shows acknowledgement, it shows growth, it shows transformation. It should be applauded. You know, I could use an example here, Robert is, I have so much love and respect for Will Smith as a human being. He has from, at least from what I’ve known, always stepped into place of accountability and he’s always doing it work.

[00:36:43] Troy Hadeed: And he made this massive mistake and he owned it. But yet we’re still up to this day, I still hear so many people coming down on him for it. We all make these mistakes. All of us do. And there are times in our lives when all of us should have known better or did know better and we didn’t do better. And 

[00:37:09] Robert Hossary: I’m saying in a sense all of it now, you know, there’s a line of course, right? Because it doesn’t mean. We need laws and regulations Yep. To hold our society together. Yep. If you are inflicting harm upon someone and you don’t see that what you’re doing is wrong, then you need that needs there.

[00:37:33] Troy Hadeed: There’s certain punishment or regulation that needs to be enforced. Correct. So, not seeing we have a lawless society, but I am talking about relationships and this refers to celebrities who make mistakes like they’re human too. Right. And, It’s just so important. Like I, I’ve made some mistakes.

[00:37:54] Troy Hadeed: I’ve said some really foolish things. 

[00:37:57] Robert Hossary: Haven’t we all? 

[00:37:59] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. I would never want to be locked in a box. And labeled according to my mistake. Right. I’ve owned it, I’ve grown from it. But somebody can’t grow from their mistakes. Shame isn’t any way to do that. Maybe a little bit of shame momentarily, but, you know, by shaming someone, it doesn’t bring that growth.

[00:38:24] Troy Hadeed: And when someone steps into light and acknowledges they were wrong, you know, that takes so much power and we should applaud that. 

[00:38:35] Robert Hossary: Yes, absolutely. 

[00:38:38] Troy Hadeed: I love to describe it, Robert, as, think of the human experience as a curriculum. It’s like school. And each one of us have come to school, but we have, each one of us have a very individual curriculum to walk.

[00:38:55] Troy Hadeed: And while we are navigating our own curriculum and learning our own lessons, we are also writing someone else’s curriculum. So if I were to wrong you, Robert, that experience is for me to learn to overcome guilt and shame. But it’s also to teach you forgiveness and empathy and understanding. So we’re also intertwined in our curriculums are so intertwined that while we’re walking our own, our mistakes are actually setting a stage for someone else’s growth.

[00:39:36] Robert Hossary: What a wonderful way to put it. That’s great. I really like that. So, Let’s just move on to the next lesson because again, every one of these, Troy, we are gonna talk for hours.

[00:39:49] Lesson 8:Stop asking the question, “How can I change the world?” – Have the courage to ask, “How am I changing the world?” 

[00:39:49] Robert Hossary: Lesson number eight, stop asking the question, how can I change the world? Have the courage to ask the question, how am I changing the world?

[00:40:03] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. This one, I believe, comes from environmentalist Jane Goodall, which I think a lot of people are familiar with. And, it really hit home for me, you know, cuz growing up and as a child, I always wondered, how can I change the world? How can I change the world? And that seems so big. And if we have seven, 8 billion people on the planet asking, how can I change the world?

[00:40:27] Troy Hadeed: We’ll all be wondering, how can I change the world? You know, and asking a question, how am I changing the world now? It’s acknowledging, you know, we have this thing in our culture now where people wanna step into their power. Well, this is your power. Your power isn’t only being courageous and standing up for what you believe in.

[00:40:52] Troy Hadeed: Acknowledging your power is understanding that every word, every thought, and every action that we embody changes the world around us every single day. That we shift energy in a room, that we change perspectives, that we impact and affect people every single day in our lives. And we have to take responsibility for that and start to really look and ask you questions.

[00:41:24] Troy Hadeed: What impact am I having on people? And, you know, I did a corporate keynote speech for a company recently, and there their paper statement was Better Choices for Better World. And it’s an amazing company, but I pose the question to them, A better world for who? Because you can make better choices to create a better world for your families and your inner circles while having a negative impact on a larger collective.

[00:41:58] Troy Hadeed: So it’s essential that we really begin to dig into this and look at the impact of our actions and words and our thoughts, because we change the world every single day. And if we had 8 billion people looking at how we change the world every day in our lives, that’s how we actually change the world.

[00:42:19] Robert Hossary: Beautiful. This resonates with me a lot because I came across this thinking very recently in the last three or four years since I started working for an organization that helps people who are living with disabilities. That’s where I learned what real privilege was. 

[00:42:40] Robert Hossary: Yes. but also where I learned my purpose.

[00:42:42] Robert Hossary: I’ve since left there, I am now CEO of another organization that helps people with type one diabetes. 

[00:42:50] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:42:50] Robert Hossary: So again, it’s not about me. It’s about “how can I help the community? How can I make the world I live in a little better for everyone else?” 

[00:43:02] Troy Hadeed: Yeah.

[00:43:03] Robert Hossary: Do I succeed? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. But again, as you said, that’s what makes us all the same.

[00:43:09] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. And to, to link it back to the corporate world. Robert, here’s what I’ve realized. , because I think all your listeners need to acknowledge their power. And I’ve recently begun speaking in this corporate environment, and from my very first speaking engagement, I realized, wow, I realized how much of an influence corporate culture has on social culture.

[00:43:38] Robert Hossary: Yes. 

[00:43:39] Troy Hadeed: And for generations, corporate culture has always put profit above everything else. 

[00:43:46] Robert Hossary: Yes. 

[00:43:47] Troy Hadeed: So, no wonder it’s impacted social culture in that way. and profit is important. I’m not living in la la land, right? Profit means sustainability. It’s important, but we need to even outta scale, we need to put wellness and we need to look at, there’s certain things that should be put above profit.

[00:44:08] Troy Hadeed: Things like social impact, things like wellness. What are we contributing? And because if we can begin that shift in our corporate environment, that shift is gonna happen in our social world as well. 

[00:44:23] Robert Hossary: Agreed. Agreed. Let’s hope that happens sooner rather than later. Troy? 

[00:44:28] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:44:29] Lesson 9:cultivate a loving relationship with your mind

[00:44:29] Robert Hossary: Alright, let’s move on to lesson number nine.

[00:44:31] Robert Hossary: Now, I’ve gotta admit nine and 10 baffle me. So you are really gonna have to explain these. So lesson number nine, cultivate a loving relationship with your mind. Okay. What do you mean by that? 

[00:44:47] Troy Hadeed: You know, there’s a teaching in, it’s by a yoga teacher called B.K.S. Iyengar . He’s no longer in his body, but he used to say that in mind is king of everything.

[00:44:58] Troy Hadeed: So right now behind me, some people may not have a visual, but there’s a wooden wall. And if I told you the color of that wall was white, you would probably tell me I’m crazy because it’s actually like brown. But in reality, if I chose to believe that wall was white, then it was white. If I grew up believing that what color white and was always told that what color white, then you cannot change my mind unless I choose to believe differently.

[00:45:34] Troy Hadeed: The mind, Robert, is the most powerful thing we have. It changes our entire perception of the world. It changes our entire reality. Right. If someone came into this call or if you came into this call thinking I was a complete idiot and had no idea what I was saying or talking about, our conversation would be very different.

[00:46:01] Robert Hossary: Yes. 

[00:46:01] Troy Hadeed: Because you’ve already painted that narrative on me. And we label people with narratives, we label experiences with narratives, but we don’t always understand how powerful that narrative is, because the mind creates our reality in every way. And you know, recently, Robert, like after three months ago, I spent a period of time in absolute darkness.

[00:46:31] Troy Hadeed: And prior to that, I had spent a period in absolute silence, 10 days in silence. And I know what happens in mind, and I knew how powerful the mind is. But in darkness, I experienced things I could not even possibly imagine. Like I faced death. I never thought I would leave that room ever again. And it showed me how powerful the mind really is because right now I can see things around me.

[00:47:03] Troy Hadeed: There’s an aspect of reality and my perception of reality that can tell me that right now a missile is probably not going to fall on my house. Right? A tree maybe, but not a missile. but in darkness, there’s no perception of reality. In absolute darkness, you can’t see anything and there’s no one else around you.

[00:47:29] Troy Hadeed: So your mind becomes 100% the director of your reality, and it gives you a glimpse as to how powerful your mind really is. So whether someone chooses to believe the world is a bad place, or chooses to believe someone is a bad person, or chooses to believe an experience or a narrative of their life, or chooses to believe they’re sick and they’re ill and they’ll never get better, the things we say and we choose to believe, we are far more powerful than we realize.

[00:48:05] Troy Hadeed: Hmm. And we give those things so much more power when we choose to believe them. 

[00:48:11] Robert Hossary: So how do I cultivate a loving relationship with my mind then? 

[00:48:17] Troy Hadeed: All right. So I describe a relationship with her mind like a marriage, but it’s an eternal marriage. There’s no separation and there’s no divorce. It’s you and your mind forever.

[00:48:32] Troy Hadeed: Your mind is your ride or die. And like any relationship, Robert, for there to be a holistic loving relationship, there must be intimacy. And intimacy is just spending time with your partner trying to understand your partner. So this can resemble things like meditation maybe, and it’s so ironic cuz in a world today someone could say, yeah, I’m spending a day alone.

[00:49:03] Troy Hadeed: But yet they’re on Netflix, they’re on their devices, they’re reading, even reading books is not spending time alone. 

[00:49:09] Robert Hossary: Yeah. 

[00:49:10] Troy Hadeed: You’re, you’re still with an external influence, like to spend time with your mind is to sit with your mind, look at what comes up and listen to it and try to understand where these emotions and where these thoughts come from.

[00:49:27] Troy Hadeed: That is intimacy with your mind. And even if it’s three to five minutes a day, maybe how it begins, you just set your time on your phone, put it aside, and you sit with your mind and you look and listen to what your mind has to say. 

[00:49:44] Robert Hossary: I think that is wonderful advice. everything that I’ve been researching on, the different philosophies as well as, everything that we’ve heard about mindfulness, et cetera, all comes back to the fact that you have to understand yourself.

[00:50:01] Robert Hossary: And as you said, the most powerful part of yourself is your mind. 

[00:50:06] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:50:06] Robert Hossary: So get to know your mind. Love it. no, that, that’s fantastic. Thank you, Troy. 

[00:50:11] Lesson 10:Breathing is not something we do, but something that is done to us

[00:50:11] Robert Hossary: Alright, well let’s move to the 10th and penultimate lesson because I’ve got one more question to ask you, but lesson number 10, this one again, baffled me.

[00:50:24] Robert Hossary: Breathing is not something we do, but something that is done to us now. I’m so , I’m sorry to laugh at this, Troy, but I have no clue what the hell that means. 

[00:50:38] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, I’m not surprised. Robert, before I answer that, I will say I want to finish. I told you about the teaching of B.K.S. Iyengar where he said the mind is king of everything, but that’s only half of the teaching.

[00:50:53] Troy Hadeed: His full teaching says, mind is king of everything, but breath is king of your mind. And one thing that helps us tame our mind and create this intimacy with our mind is our breath. Our breath is a king of our mind. It’s a king of our emotions. It’s a king of our reality. So it’s so important that people know and understand their breath.

[00:51:21] Troy Hadeed: But I learned to breathe at 27 years old, and that was three years after I had been teaching yoga. So I know for a fact that most people live their entire lives and don’t understand how breath works. And I will say this cuz I understand this could sound like mumbo jumbo, But we put so much emphasis on what we eat, how much exercise we get.

[00:51:49] Troy Hadeed: Even sleep is really important. But put this in perspective. We breathe 23,000 times a day and we can’t live more than three or four minutes without breathing. So what do you think has the most impact on our body of all? Breath is really important. And one of the first things any doctor should ask us is, how are you breathing?

[00:52:15] Troy Hadeed: Because they might ask, are you stressed? But breath controls your stress. Breath can dissolve stress. Very first question should be, how are you breathing? So I’ll get into this, I’ll get into it now. Robert, I’ve blah long enough. But the understanding that we don’t actually breathe, breath is breathing is something that is done to us.

[00:52:38] Troy Hadeed: Is the medical anatomy of breathing. This is not like some yoga Eastern philosophy perspective. This is medicine, right? If I were to ask you, when you breathe, do you pull air into your body? You would probably tell me yes as most listeners would. They would say, yes. When I inhale, I pull it into my body.

[00:53:01] Troy Hadeed: Well, that’s not actually accurate. Here’s how breath works, and your listeners are smart, so I’ll, I won’t spend too much time on this, but think of your thoracic cavity, which is from your diaphragm up to your sternum, which is where the majority of breath happens, right? . Think of that as a box. 

[00:53:20] Troy Hadeed: Inside that box has a set air pressure. When you expand the volume of that box, What happens? The air pressure, it goes down. Volume and air pressure inversely related. If you increase the volume of a space, the air pressure inside of it decreases, right? So when I expand my ribcage and my diaphragm descends into my belly, and my chest expands and my back body expands, these are only dimensions of breathing.

[00:53:54] Troy Hadeed: When I increase the volume of my thoracic cavity, the air pressure inside of me decreases. There’s also a law of physics that says that gasses move from high pressure to low pressure. This is not in question. So when I expand the volume of my thoracic cavity and the air pressure inside of me decreases, that means that the air pressure outside of me.

[00:54:21] Troy Hadeed: Is higher than the air pressure inside of me. So there’s that force. So I explain to people this way, there is an external force that breathes you, that pushes that air into you. All you have to do is create this space to receive it. And that might seem as insignificant, but it’s not. It changes your relationship to breath.

[00:54:48] Troy Hadeed: It also changes your relationship to everything and everyone around you, because the same force that breathes me, the same force that breathes you, even though you are on a different side of the world. And I also want to throw this in here, Robert, because it was very profound for me to learn that the word spirit, like Holy Spirit, actually comes from the Latin word spiritus.

[00:55:15] Troy Hadeed: That means to breathe. And it makes sense to me that there is some divine agency in our breath because it is the one thing that connects every living being in every bit of creation on the planet. The air molecules inside Of My right now, possibly we’re inside of you or will be inside of you at some point in your life.

[00:55:40] Troy Hadeed: If you, if I sit next to someone, we may not be genetically related or related by blood or related by opinion or perspective or ideology, but we are connected by air we breathe. Hence why the pandemic was such a big deal. 

[00:55:57] Robert Hossary: That’s deep. I mean, The scientific part of it aside, which is also fascinating, the fact that one, we’re connected. Yeah.

[00:56:05] Robert Hossary: Brings, it brings this full circle back to everything that we’ve talked about. But two, there’s not enough discussion, knowledge, practice about breathing because you’re right, it does reduce stress. 

[00:56:20] Robert Hossary: Yeah. It does clear the mind, it clarifies your thoughts. I hear you. I’m with you on that. I think we should take some time to understand how we breathe.

[00:56:32] Robert Hossary: And learn to breathe. Yeah. Purposefully. 

[00:56:36] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. Intentionally. 

[00:56:38] Robert Hossary: Intentionally. 

[00:56:40] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. I tell people intentional breathing is different from breathing. I think we take breath for granted because as soon as we come out of the womb, it arrives. So we’ve been taught to believe that breath is automatic and it is, thank God it is.

[00:56:55] Troy Hadeed: But there is a difference between breath being automatic and having a relationship and intimacy with breath. Yeah. Because when you create that intimacy with breath, you can now use that to alter emotional states. 

[00:57:10] Robert Hossary: and I have, yeah. And it does work. So I strongly advise anybody listening and watching.

[00:57:17] Robert Hossary: Make the time. Test it out. Yeah. Listen, Troy, he knows what he’s talking about 

[00:57:23] Troy Hadeed: in a, you know, in a corporate world too, Robert, what I like to point out is that the physical body and his spiritual body, emotional body are all connected, right? But when I get stressed, do I get anxiety?

[00:57:36] Troy Hadeed: The physical muscles of my body contract and my breath gets very fast. So if my physical body is in a state of contraction, Guess what? I can’t expand my body to create space, to receive breath, especially if I don’t know how breath works. . But if I have a relationship to my breath, I can use, all I need is two or three breaths, and I can use that to release the physical tension of my body and alter my emotional mental state.

[00:58:14] Robert Hossary: You can absolutely do that. I can attest to that. Troy, this has been absolutely wonderful. I, I’ve had the time of my life talking to you. Let me finish up by asking you one question. What have you unlearned? What have you had to unlearn?

[00:58:32] Troy Hadeed: Well, I hesitate to say I have unlearned it because I think I am still trying to unlearn it, and I think it’s just, I might be unlearning it until they leave my body. And this might sound very esoteric and very woo woo, woo, I’m not on, I’m not woo woo. woo. I like to believe I’m very tangible and real life.

[00:58:54] Troy Hadeed: but I am unlearning the narrative that this is my body. This is who I am, you know, from the day I was born, like all of us, I was told this is my body and my name is Troy. And I’ve learned that’s actually not true. That’s not a narrative I abide to because I believe that when I leave my body, There is life after death, whatever it is.

[00:59:22] Troy Hadeed: I believe that this conversation energetically will live in the minds and hearts of your listeners long after I leave my body, which means that the energy in which I’ve contributed a world will live forever. So in that way, we all have people who we love, who have left their bodies, who live with us, they aren’t dead.

[00:59:45] Troy Hadeed: They aren’t gone, they don’t cease to exist. So even to put a more tangible point to it, if I go tomorrow, and I change my name, am I still the person I am today? Yes. I just changed my name. Or if last year I weighed 300 pounds and I lost all this weight in a few years. Am I still the same person? Yes. I’ve just grown in certain ways.

[01:00:15] Troy Hadeed: So, and the problem with this, narrative of I am my body and my name’s Troy. What that does, Robert, is it makes us separate and this narrative that our entire world is built on. So whether we are conscious of it or not, let me put a hammer a nail in it here. As long as I believe I am my body and this is who I am. I am saying that when I leave my body, I will no longer exist.

[01:00:44] Troy Hadeed: And what I’m also doing is unconsciously maybe every decision I make and every choice I make will be governed by my need for self-preservation. Because as long as I am my body and this is all that I am and I will cease to exist, I will do everything that I possibly can to preserve my identity and who I think I am.

[01:01:12] Troy Hadeed: And as long as we identify with our individual form Robert, it inhibits our ability to love one another. And the more we can move beyond this attachment and this individual narrative is the closer we get to understanding unconditional love. 

[01:01:32] Robert Hossary: Troy, I can definitely say to you that’s the first time we have had that unlearned lesson on the show.

[01:01:41] Robert Hossary: It’s hard for a lot of people to grasp what you’re saying. Yeah. simply because society still doesn’t understand it. But yeah, as you said, we have very smart listeners and viewers, and I’m sure that you all heard what Troy said and you know, some of you have taken it to heart.

[01:02:01] Robert Hossary: Some of you are nodding furiously and agreeing with it, and some of you are saying, what the hell was he talking about? I get that Troy gets that. yeah, and that’s fine. That’s okay. Rewind this, listen to it again because this whole episode has been very deep. Troy, all I wanna say is thank you.

[01:02:20] Robert Hossary: Thank you for making the time to be on the show today. Thank you for being with us and sharing those fantastic lessons with us. 

[01:02:26] Troy Hadeed: thank you Robert. It’s been a pleasure and I honor just to be here and, thank you for giving me space and opportunity to share. 

[01:02:35] Robert Hossary: Anytime. Where can our listeners find you?

[01:02:38] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, so they can find me at https://troyhadeed.com/. That is my website. 

[01:02:44] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. And they can find me on Instagram and if anybody is interested in personal sessions or coaching or you know, about yoga or public speaking or would love to have me as a guest wherever, whenever, or have any questions at all, they can find me there.

[01:03:04] Troy Hadeed: And I would absolutely love to be a part of anything. Anything. 

[01:03:09] Robert Hossary: and we’ll finish here today. You’ve been listening to 10 Lessons Learned. Our guest today is Troy Hadeed, yoga teacher, social entrepreneur, and author, coming to us all the way from Trinidad and Tobago today. This episode is supported as always by the Professional Development Forum.

[01:03:30] Robert Hossary: please tell us what you think of today’s lessons. Leave us a comment, leave us a review. You can email us. You can send an email to podcast 10 lessons learned.com. That’s Podcast one zero lessons learned.com, and we’ll get back to you. We’d love to know what you thought of Troy’s lessons. We’d love to know what you think of the show.

[01:03:52] Robert Hossary: And if you have any other ideas for us, go ahead, hit that subscribe button and turn on your notification bell. Say you don’t miss an episode of the only show on the internet that changes the world, one lesson at a time. 

 This episode is produced by Robert Hossary. Sponsored as always by Professional Development Forum, which office insights, community or discussions, podcasts, parties, anything you want here, but they’re unique and it’s all free online. You can find the www.professionaldevelopmentforum.org you’ve heard from us we’d like to hear from you. Email us it’s podcast@10lessonslearned.com. Remember, this is the podcast the only podcast. That’s makes the world wiser lesson by lesson.

 
Troy Hadeed

Troy Hadeed – Everyone fails. Everyone succeeds. That’s what makes us the same

Troy Hadeed is a Social Entrepreneur, Philosopher, Yoga Teacher, Author. He explains why ”Privilege is not a bad word”, why you should “Cultivate a loving relationship with your mind”, how “Forgiveness does not depend on an apology” and much more. Hosted by Robert Hossary.

About Troy Hadeed

Troy Hadeed was born in Trinidad & Tobago and has lived there for the majority of his life, today he still calls the forested North Coast of Trinidad his home and lives among a community of hummingbirds.

He attended the University of Tampa in Florida and graduated with a degree in business. After that Troy returned to Trinidad to open Trinidad’s first Hemp store, which he ran for eight years before starting a biofuel business, and then finally nurturing a beautiful yoga studio and community known as One Yoga Trinidad—recently rebranding as BeyondYogaTv.com

Troy has traveled the world on a ship, walked on foot across Costa Rica, sat in silence for 10 days at a time, spent time in absolute darkness, and has dedicated the last 15 years of his life to the practice and teaching of Yoga. He has recently completed his first book, Popcorn in My Pocket; Insightful Reflections For A Better You & A Better World, scheduled to launch in 2023

Episode Notes

Lesson 1: Do you disagree or are you avoiding having the conversation? 04:38
Lesson 2: Nurture a personal relationship with (your) GOD & allow others to nurture theirs. 08:16
Lesson 3: Forgiveness does not depend on an apology. 15:08
Lesson 4: Hope & Faith are not the same and do not carry the same power. 20:15
Lesson 5: Privilege is not a bad word 29:32
Lesson 6: The most valuable currency on the planet is our support, attention, and love. 30:23
Lesson 7: Everyone fails. Everyone succeeds. That’s what makes us the same. 34:43
Lesson 8: Stop asking the question, “How can I change the world?” – Have the courage to ask, “How am I changing the world?” 39:49
Lesson 9: Cultivate a loving relationship with your mind. 44:29
Lesson 10: Breathing is not something we do, but something that is done to us 50:11

Troy Hadeed – Everyone fails. Everyone succeeds. That’s what makes us the same

[00:00:08] Robert Hossary: Hello and welcome to 10 Lessons Learned, where we talk to sages and gurus, leaders in luminaries from all over the world to dispense their wisdom for your career, business and life. To make the world a wiser place, lesson by lesson.

[00:00:25] Robert Hossary: My name is Robert Hossary and I’m your host for this episode. 

[00:00:30] Robert Hossary: Today’s guest is Troy Hadeed. Troy was born in Trinidad and Tobago, and has lived there the majority of his life. Today, he still calls the forested north coast of Trinidad, his home and lives amongst the community of hummingbirds. I love that. A community of hummingbirds.

[00:00:50] Robert Hossary: I would love to live in the community of hummingbirds. He attended the University of Tampa in Florida and graduated with a degree in business. 

[00:00:59] Robert Hossary: After that, Troy returned to Trinidad and opened Trinidad’s first hemp store, which he ran for eight years before starting a biofuel business, and then finally nurturing a beautiful yoga studio and community known as One Yoga Trinidad.

[00:01:15] Robert Hossary: They have recently rebranded into https://beyondyogatv.com/. I urge you to check that out. Troy has traveled the world in a ship. He’s walked on foot across Costa Rica. He sat in silence for 10 days at a time. He spent time in absolute darkness and has dedicated the last 15 years of his life to the practice and teaching of yoga.

[00:01:43] Robert Hossary: He has recently completed his first book, Popcorn in My Pocket, Insightful Reflections for A Better You and a Better World. And that’s scheduled to be released in 2023. Welcome, Troy. Thanks for being on the show today. 

[00:01:59] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, thanks. Robert. It’s an absolute pleasure and an honor to be here.

[00:02:03] Robert Hossary: You have a very diverse background, if I can use that. You’ve done a lot of things, many of us dream about. it must have given you a lot of experiences to fall back on and a lot of teachings that you are going to share with us today. 

[00:02:18] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. You know, it’s been quite a journey when I look at it and, none of it was a coincidence.

[00:02:23] Troy Hadeed: No part of it at all, you know, from my early childhood and all the circumstances that allowed me the privilege of these experiences. I think, we all very, very much planned, you know, no coincidence involved at all. 

[00:02:37] Robert Hossary: All right, let’s jump straight into it. Let me ask, let me start this off by asking you, one of our standard questions.

[00:02:44] Robert Hossary: Troy, if you had the opportunity, what would you tell your 30 year old self? 

[00:02:49] Troy Hadeed: You know, there’s,there’s a quote I recently tattooed on my arm and I wish I had come across it and understood it decades ago. And I don’t even know who the author is, cuz every time I Google it or research it, I see an unknown author.

[00:03:09] Troy Hadeed: So I can’t even cite this author. But it’s a reminder. It says I have not come to teach, I have come to Love and Love will teach, and I’ll repeat that. It says I have not come to teach, I have come to Love and Love will teach. And I think a lot of the time, you know, we get so caught up in teaching or proving our point that we create separation and otherness and we make people feel judged and disconnected.

[00:03:39] Troy Hadeed: And I like to say that if we really want to create change in a world or create change in someone, we first have to understand their perspective and then go through their perspective to create that change. We can’t try to force them through our perspective. 

[00:03:57] Robert Hossary: There’s too many people in the world that will not understand what you just said, Troy.

[00:04:02] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:04:02] Robert Hossary: There are too many people who want to force their perspective, and their values on you. Yeah. so I love that lesson because it actually means something to me. So that’s actually very powerful. And I’ll say to our audience, 

[00:04:19] Robert Hossary: today’s episode will be a little more philosophical than you may be used to, but please listen to these lessons and see how they can apply them into your daily life. Because what Troy is bringing to us today are very powerful lessons.

[00:04:38] Lesson 1:Do you disagree or are you avoiding having the conversation?

[00:04:38] Robert Hossary: So let’s get started. Okay, Troy, lesson number one.

[00:04:42] Robert Hossary: Do you disagree or are you avoiding the conversation? 

[00:04:47] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, so you know, they said this. It’s so convenient that this is lesson number one, because you know, it builds on what you just said. And very often our dismissal is actually our avoidance. And it’s easy to look at a teaching or perspective or anything really and say, that does not apply to me.

[00:05:12] Troy Hadeed: But it’s important to ask the question, how does it apply? Because everything applies. Everything applies. And I remember, you know, a story that comes to me about this, it’s, I remember one of my teachers wanted, her name was Sean Cohen. She’s such a phenomenal teacher. And I can’t quote her words exactly cuz it would make her sound like really mean, but she’s not.

[00:05:37] Troy Hadeed: But I’ll tell you how it landed for me. And how I interpreted her words was her telling me that I was wrong, I was the source of only misalignment in the world. And that hit me hard because I knew I was trying my best for decades to live from a place of love and be an alignment. But what I wasn’t looking at was all the areas of my life in which I was out of alignment.

[00:06:04] Troy Hadeed: So I was conveniently looking at all the light, all the places in my life in which I was living from a place of love. I did not create the time and space in my own life to look at the areas of disconnect, the areas of misalignment, the areas in which I showed up from a place of judgment or greed or otherness or separation.

[00:06:26] Troy Hadeed: And it’s important that we ask that question, how does this apply to my life? Because. Our growth and transformation Robert lives in our disconnect and our misalignment. Our growth and transformation doesn’t live any places where we live from a place of light and love. You know, it lives in a darkness and we have to look at that darkness.

[00:06:50] Robert Hossary: That is that, that is very powerful. I mean, what I heard and my business brain translates it into business speak. You can only grow through your failures, you can only grow through learning what your mistakes are and becoming better at those things that you were not good at. And that’s what I hear you say that yeah, those areas of misalignment, those areas of disconnect in your life are the areas where you should improve.

[00:07:22] Robert Hossary: And as you improve, you will grow. 

[00:07:25] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. But you have to see them first. 

[00:07:27] Robert Hossary: You have to see them. and that is the biggest challenge. It’s a skill that everybody can develop if they want to and everything. And I believe everything in your lesson, lessons coming up, all come back to self-awareness. 

[00:07:47] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:07:48] Robert Hossary: You must be able to look in the mirror and see the person looking back at you.

[00:07:54] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:07:55] Robert Hossary: That is so important. You can’t look in the mirror and just see what you think you want to see. That’s a fantastic lesson. Look,I think that’s great. And again, I’m. I’m gonna try not to get too philosophical here, because I can talk to you forever, Troy. I mean, yeah, I’m just on the same page as you.

[00:08:16] Lesson 2:Nurture a personal relationship with (your) GOD & allow others to nurture theirs. 

[00:08:16] Robert Hossary: Alright, let’s move to lesson number two. Nurture a personal relationship with your God and allow others to nurture theirs. That seems pretty straightforward. 

[00:08:28] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, 

[00:08:29] Troy Hadeed: doesn’t it? but we’re not, we haven’t done it for decades, Robert, and this, this lesson is probably one of the closest to my heart because one of my friends and someone I teach with, he says to me, dude, every second word out of your mouth is either love or God

[00:08:47] Troy Hadeed: So if someone is not okay with the word God, then chances are they’re not going to be very receptive to what I bring. But I’ll say it like this, for decades, even centuries maybe we have been told what God is, what God looks like and what God wants of us. God was even given an agenda. And for anyone who really connects to any aspect of God, we have to look at the historical wrongs and misalignments and oppression that have been done in the name of God.

[00:09:26] Troy Hadeed: So for me, Robert, once somebody tells me they don’t believe in God or they’re an atheist, I understand, I completely understand why somebody would want not to associate with God, but I would urge someone not to allow history to rob us of that relationship, the divinity. Because it is our right and it is the one thing that connects all of us, connects all of creation.

[00:10:00] Troy Hadeed: And if we cannot relate to some aspect of divinity, call it God, call it whatever you like, if we cannot relate to it, then it feeds our separateness, our otherness. And from that, that to me is a source of all misalignment and world, this narrative that we are separate, we are different, we are other. You know, it’s so ironic that historically, most, I can’t say all, most of the understandings of God are exclusive to one group of people or one group of understanding.

[00:10:40] Troy Hadeed: They aren’t inclusive. And that, to me, is the biggest red flag. God, divinity, whatever you want to call it, it’s okay with me. it’s your relationship to God, but it is inclusive. And I think historically the problem with people being told what God is, what God looks like and what God wants is it blocks that personal relationship to God.

[00:11:08] Troy Hadeed: And I believe that divinity communication speaks to every individual, but we just haven’t been given the tools to sit and listen. 

[00:11:18] Robert Hossary: That is very deep. Troy I’m not dismissing what you’re saying. I’m not disagreeing with what you’re saying. I’m still struggling to. Fully understand what you’re saying.

[00:11:31] Robert Hossary: I understand the fact that you’re saying whatever you call it, you know, whether it be God, whether it be mother Nature, whether it be Gaia, whether it be the universe, what, whatever. I get it. Yeah. I understand that if I can paraphrase what I think you said and you can correct me. 

[00:11:49] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, sure. 

[00:11:49] Robert Hossary: If we all take the time to connect to the belief that we have, that we are all the same, and that this planet that we are on is our home, then we can all share in that wonder of the life that is created on this planet.

[00:12:13] Robert Hossary: and the beauty, therein. I know this sounds pretty deep and maybe to a lot of our audience, you know, like, you know, a bit out there, but stop and think about it. What I’m hearing from you, Troy, is if we all connect with each other, then we can live a little more peacefully. We can live a little more in love as opposed to in hate, which is what I am seeing far too much of.

[00:12:45] Robert Hossary: I mean, yeah. Am I off the mark here? 

[00:12:46] Troy Hadeed: no. Very, just different words. You know, we all use different words and you are definitely on a mark. And you know, in any tradition of yoga, we, you know, there’s this word that’s thrown around now, it’s called namaste, come from Indian heritage, right? And the word namaste, you know, we use it very gimmicky, but the word namaste means that the God light in me, acknowledges God within you.

[00:13:15] Troy Hadeed: And to me, I extend that to all living things. to use that word, is to acknowledge that we are all God. And you know, a cool story of when this really landed. Is that the very first night I, you know, I live in a forest and I lived in a tree house for six years, but I make it very clear to people that I didn’t grow up in a forest or jungle, like I’m a city boy, right?

[00:13:41] Troy Hadeed: I’m not like this butch survivor man. so my first night in this treehouse alone was very challenging. And, you know, I was there alone. I could scream and no one would hear me. And you have all the noises and animals and creatures, every forest coming out. And I was so threatened. But there was a moment when I took a few breaths and I relaxed into it, and I realized that I felt threatened because I saw myself as separate.

[00:14:16] Troy Hadeed: And as long as I saw myself as separate, I was a threat. Not only did I feel threatened, but I became a threat that everything else was, that was around me, right? Because I would do anything to protect my identity and myself. And, in that moment, Robert, I saw these giant trees. I saw a moon glistening on the leaves of trees.

[00:14:44] Troy Hadeed: I began to see all the magnificence around me, whereas before that all I could feel was threatened and scared. 

[00:14:54] Robert Hossary: That’s very, very deep. Troy. I hear you and I understand what you’re saying and yeah, I love that. All I can say is wow. Let’s move on to the next one because as I said, I can sit at your feet and listen for hours.

[00:15:08] Lesson 3:Forgiveness does not depend on an apology. 

[00:15:08] Robert Hossary: But let’s move on to lesson number three, which by the way, is probably, one of my favorites. Lesson number three, forgiveness does not depend on an apology. Yeah. How true is that? 

[00:15:23] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, of course. And we, I’ve heard that before and we say that before, but I don’t think, you know, we say a lot of things, Robert, without really understanding them or breaking them down, or realizing how they apply to our lives.

[00:15:39] Troy Hadeed: So I like to try to break these things down. So I define forgiveness as believing someone can be better and do better even when they don’t realize how, or they don’t even realize they need to be better. So it’s important to me to acknowledge that every single individual is a product of their conditioning and their experiences.

[00:16:06] Troy Hadeed: If their conditioning was negative, was full of fear, if they’ve never felt secure, then that breeds certain characteristics within someone, and it’s important to really put a finger on that because once we see one another as a product of our conditioning and experiences, then it’s almost like we have a responsibility to help someone dissolve or overcome negative conditioning and negative experiences.

[00:16:41] Troy Hadeed: But we have to see beyond that conditioning and acknowledge that it is not below that. Conditioning is a child of God. And that is what we need to see. We need to see beyond that narrative to the child, the soul of God that lives within every individual. And I believe on some level, you know, I can’t answer any questions, no one can, but on some level we’ve come here as human beings in this experience to help one another move through all of this conditioning.

[00:17:14] Robert Hossary: So true. so true. However, and while I absolutely agree with that, yeah. As a human being that is a product of the conditioning of the society I, I live in and that I’ve grown up in. , as much as I want to forgive someone, I find it bloody hard to forgive them. There are people who I agree with you.

[00:17:38] Robert Hossary: The people who have crossed me are not inherently evil people, so I agree with that. Absolutely. I just find it really difficult to get to the point where I can just forgive them and help them overcome that. How would you suggest one goes about doing that? 

[00:18:00] Troy Hadeed: Well, I’m trying not to jump ahead to lessons here, but they’re also interconnected, right?

[00:18:06] Troy Hadeed: So I will say this Robert, I’ll give a little story and then I’ll explain, take a mosquito for instance, if a mosquito bites you Someone might squash the mosquito and feel really attacked. And then I would ask you a question, well, are you mad at a mosquito? And they might say, well, yes, the mosquito bit me.

[00:18:29] Troy Hadeed: And while the mosquito may have bit you intentionally knowing it was going to bite you and knowing it was gonna cause you harm, that’s all a mosquito knows how to do. That’s all it’s ever been taught. So it wasn’t a personal attack. It’s not that the mosquito is out to get Robert, the mosquito just wants blood, needs blood.

[00:18:57] Troy Hadeed: And Robert happens to be in its way. So Robert gets bitten. So I think we’re all. Sometimes we’re casualties in this human experience in which we all had to learn to love and try to make it all unfold. But I think what makes forgiveness really hard is when we attach to our personal identity, our body, and name and form, because then anything that is done to us, we take, as a personal attack, even if somebody disagrees with us, we take it as a personal attack because our identity is so caught up in this individual narrative of body and form.

[00:19:42] Troy Hadeed: You know? 

[00:19:43] Robert Hossary: That is so true. and I think that is how one handles it by not taking it as a personal attack. Yeah. And understanding what you said. I will give lots of thought on that and I will, I, I commit to you, I will improve . 

[00:20:01] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. I do think, Robert, that once we get our head around this, forgiveness is not an option.

[00:20:08] Troy Hadeed: It’s inevitable. 

[00:20:10] Robert Hossary: Yes. Yes. I see that and I understand that. Okay. 

[00:20:15] Lesson 4:Hope & Faith are not the same and do not carry the same power. 

[00:20:15] Robert Hossary: Let’s go to lesson number four, which again, is a very powerful lesson and I love it. But lesson number four, hope and faith are not the same and they do not carry the same power. 

[00:20:27] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. I love all of these actually. I had, I had fun with it, Robert.

[00:20:32] Troy Hadeed: I felt like I could have written about a hundred lessons and I really had to narrow them

[00:20:38] Troy Hadeed: So we often refer to hope and faith as interchangeable. Whether we realize it or not, we use them interchangeably and then not hope carries doubt, uncertainty, unknowing, a lack of confidence. This is what hope is.

[00:20:57] Troy Hadeed: I’m not saying hope, it’s a bad thing. Hope is beautiful, but we must know the difference. Faith, there’s no room for doubt. There’s no room for uncertainty. Faith is an absolute knowing. An absolute knowing. I was saying to someone the other day, faith is not religious. Faith does not belong to religion.

[00:21:22] Troy Hadeed: It is not even tied to God. We believe in God. We believe in divinity because of faith. Faith has to come first. Faith is the knowing that we are part of a larger intelligence, that there is something happening. This is what faith is. So faith does not mean that we are clairvoyant or we can predict the future.

[00:21:51] Troy Hadeed: That’s not what faith is. Lemme draw an example here with hope. If I hope something can happen and it doesn’t happen the way I wanted it to, then I feel defeated. You know, I feel down and I feel like a failure. But with faith now, if I have faith instead of hope, when things don’t happen as I hoped or I intended, Then I have faith that there is a larger intelligence at play.

[00:22:25] Troy Hadeed: That there is something happening for me to learn, or that I am being used in a way, or that this experience is being used in a way to bring someone else growth and transformation or my self growth and transformation. So with that faith, I am able to maybe retreat and reflect and then realize that maybe there’s another way to bring about what I want to bring about or maybe I need to go in a different direction altogether.

[00:23:01] Troy Hadeed: But hope and faith are very different things. The way I describe it is like hope is dreaming. Hope creates these dreams, but hope can’t get us there. Faith gets us there and faith can manifest dreams larger than we ever hoped. 

[00:23:23] Robert Hossary: That is wonderful. I’m, that is very deep too. everything that you are saying, I have to go back and listen and I’ll actually say this to our audience.

[00:23:33] Robert Hossary: Go back and listen to all this again, because just hearing it once might not be enough. I know it’s not enough for me. but I do understand your definition of both and I agree with them. They are two totally different things. and I think I have stopped hoping things happen and in a business sense for me anyway.

[00:23:55] Troy Hadeed: Yeah.

[00:23:55] Robert Hossary: I don’t hope that my strategies work. I have faith that they’ll work because I’ve researched them. I know what’s going to happen. I know how it should happen, and if it doesn’t happen the way that it’s planned, then I make an alteration. 

[00:24:11] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:24:12] Robert Hossary: You know, you can’t just sit back and go, oh, that didn’t work. Oh, I hope it will come back. It’s not going to. 

[00:24:19] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. And from an entrepreneurial standpoint to Robert, it’s like, I don’t know if you can relate, but from a business standpoint, what I’ve found is that when you put one foot forward and keep one foot back, things don’t generally happen. , 

[00:24:37] Robert Hossary: you don’t go anywhere 

[00:24:38] Troy Hadeed: you don’t go anywhere.

[00:24:39] Troy Hadeed: You have to commit with both feet 100% to,

[00:24:45] Robert Hossary: And that is faith. 

[00:24:46] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. You have to be willing to risk it all. 

[00:24:50] Robert Hossary: Yep. 

[00:24:50] Troy Hadeed: And know that if it doesn’t work out, there’s something else. 

[00:24:54] Robert Hossary: Yep. 

[00:24:54] Troy Hadeed: You’re gonna find your feet. 

[00:24:55] Robert Hossary: what a wonderful analogy to put it back into our business sense. Brilliant. Love it. 

[00:25:00] Lesson 5:Privilege is not a bad word

[00:25:00] Robert Hossary: Alright, let’s move to lesson number five.

[00:25:04] Robert Hossary: So Troy, lesson number five. Privilege is not a bad word. 

[00:25:09] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. You know, I grew up, Robert, I always say I come from a place of privilege in so many ways. I can even count my privilege, right? Sometimes when we think of privilege, we think of the larger labels of privilege, and I am light-skinned. I come from a well off financial family.

[00:25:30] Troy Hadeed: I am straight. I am physically well able. I can go on and on and on about all the privilege, larger labels of privilege that I benefit from.

[00:25:41] Troy Hadeed: And we talk a lot about these larger labels of privilege, but let me say first that I grew up being ashamed of my privilege as a child and in young adolescents, right?

[00:25:55] Troy Hadeed: I didn’t wanna tell people my name. I didn’t wanna tell people what neighborhood I lived in because I didn’t want to be seen as separate or other, or stsh or spoiled. But what I realized is that if I did not own my privilege, my privilege owned me. And what I mean by that is if I hid from my privilege, the only person who was gonna benefit was me and my inner circles and my family.

[00:26:26] Troy Hadeed: But if I could own my privilege and let go of the shame and guilt that might exist around privilege, I could then use my privilege to serve something greater than myself. To serve the larger collective and to even sometimes dissolve these circumstances, that created my privilege in the first place. 

[00:26:51] Troy Hadeed: Or at least try to, and when I talk about privilege, I have to mention that the largest privilege in our world, the most powerful privilege in our world, and the one that is spoken of least of all, is the privilege of knowing what it means to be loved.

[00:27:09] Troy Hadeed: And this comes back to conditioning and experiences, right? We take it for granted that everyone has someone to nurture them, to teach them right from wrong, to love them, to make them feel secure and safe. But that’s not true at all. The majority of people have never known that. And, it’s important to own that privilege if none others, because it’s easier to look at someone and say, you should know better, do better.

[00:27:42] Troy Hadeed: But what if they were never shown how to grow up in a life where you never feel safe or secure, you never felt like you were part of the collective? Then how can you actually care for the collective if you never felt like you were part of it? 

[00:27:59] Robert Hossary: That is so true,in so many different ways. very powerful stuff.

[00:28:05] Robert Hossary: Very powerful stuff. And you’re right, privilege is not a bad word as long as everybody understands that either they were privileged in certain areas or in their whole life, or they weren’t. But it is something that we must own. It’s something that we must say. I’m, I say, the same as you. I was lucky enough to have food on the table, to have a roof over my head, to have clothes on my back that would be provided to me by my family.

[00:28:38] Robert Hossary: That is a privilege. 

[00:28:40] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:28:41] Robert Hossary: Yeah. 

[00:28:41] Robert Hossary: So I see how all your lessons fit into each other, and I’m, yeah.

[00:28:45] Robert Hossary: I’m just having a wonderful time. This is an awakening for me, Troy. Thank you. 

[00:28:51] Troy Hadeed: Beautiful. And I would say on that note Robert, I know we have limited time on each one of these lessons could probably take an hour in itself. 

[00:28:58] Robert Hossary: I would love to do a podcast on each lesson. Yes. 

[00:29:01] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. But, for listeners, like the fact that you are listening to this podcast you’re privileged.

[00:29:08] Robert Hossary: Yeah. 

[00:29:09] Troy Hadeed: You know, a privilege, an advantage. And sometimes we get so caught up in the ways in which we are not privileged. Yeah. And not advantage that we forget to look at the areas in our life in which we are privileged. And once we can own that comes with a responsibility. 

[00:29:27] Robert Hossary: What an excellent lesson.

[00:29:29] Robert Hossary: What an excellent lesson. Alright, Troy, 

[00:29:32] Affiliate Break

[00:29:32] Robert Hossary: I’m gonna take a very quick break. We’d like to thank our affiliate partner Audible. Audible is an amazing way to consume 10 lessons learned books and other podcasts, allowing you to build a library. Of knowledge all in one place. You can start your free 30 day trial by going to audible trial.com/ten.

[00:29:55] Robert Hossary: Lessons Learned with Audible, you can find your favorite lesson while at home or on the gutter. Once again, that’s audible trial.com/one zero. Lessons learned for a free 30 day trial. The link will be in the show notes. 

[00:30:13] Robert Hossary: Our guest today is Troy Hadeed. He’s a yoga teacher and author, a social entrepreneur, and we’re proud and privileged to have him with us here today. 

[00:30:23] Lesson 6:The most valuable currency on the planet is our support, attention, and love. 

[00:30:23] Robert Hossary: So, Troy, let’s move on to lesson number six. The most valuable currency on the planet is our support, attention and love.

[00:30:36] Robert Hossary: Tell me about that. 

[00:30:37] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. You know, We often think of currency, Robert, as money. And when we think of corruption, we think of politics, big business, millions and billions of dollars being shuffled around in exchange for services and support. And while I understand that our relationship to our society produced the people who are now, in corruption or in corrupt circles, and we have to ask a question, well, where did that come from?

[00:31:13] Troy Hadeed: So what I like to point out is every day we participate in corruption. Every single day, each one of us, because the most valuable thing we can give each other is our attention, our support, and our love. And generally, if people don’t act in a manner that pleases us, we withdraw our support and withdraw our love.

[00:31:44] Troy Hadeed: Or energetically we give them a cold shoulder. Cold shoulder or a silent treatment. We do this in relationships, in marriages, in friendships, in a workplace. We do it everywhere. This is corruption. We are just trading emotional support. We are trading love. We are trading our attention. Imagine that as kids.

[00:32:10] Troy Hadeed: We, we, we bribe our kids. Stop crying, I’ll buy you ice cream. That is a bribe. That is corruption. Rather than explaining to a child trying to understand why they are crying and trying to make them feel safe, we bribe them. And so I understand, right? If we grow up in a society where emotionally we’re trading this currency of love and attention and support, all of a sudden I’m an adult.

[00:32:44] Troy Hadeed: I’m in politics, so I’m ahead of this corporation, with billions of dollars at my disposal. Why not? It’s normal. I’ve been doing it my whole life. Society does it. So, as much as we want to start to remove corruption from politics and big business and our world, we have to start to look at the currency we are trading every day in our lives.

[00:33:12] Robert Hossary: That is incredibly confronting. Troy and I will, I’ll speak on behalf of myself and probably the entire audience that is incredibly confronting, to sit back and say, well, I’m a good person. And then hear what you’ve just said and think, well, yeah, I’ve done that, and I’m not disagreeing with you.

[00:33:37] Robert Hossary: It is, I can see the definition there. I can understand that the trading of emotions, the trading of love, the trading of affection for something else for obedience. 

[00:33:52] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:33:53] Robert Hossary: Most of the time is corruption. I can see that. I’m just stunned that I haven’t seen that before. 

[00:34:01] Troy Hadeed: it, yeah. 

[00:34:02] Robert Hossary: that is confronting.

[00:34:04] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. It’s hard. It’s hard. And we all do it.

[00:34:07] Robert Hossary: It’s very hard. 

[00:34:07] Troy Hadeed: we all do it. Even to this day I do it. But again, you can only bring light to something when you see it and you start to look at it. 

[00:34:16] Robert Hossary: Well, we hope that we brought light to our audience. you definitely shone a spotlight for me. I will definitely be looking at the way I deal with that, personally, 

[00:34:27] Troy Hadeed: And I just wanna add, Robert, you know, some people might hear this and like, feel like they can’t challenge anyone or they can’t, we can.

[00:34:35] Troy Hadeed: It’s called conversation. It’s called being vulnerable and expressing how we feel or how something makes us feel. 

[00:34:43] Lesson 7:Everyone fails. Everyone succeeds. That’s what makes us the same. 

[00:34:43] Robert Hossary: let’s go to lesson number seven.

[00:34:46] Robert Hossary: Everybody fails. Everybody succeeds and that’s what makes us the same. Tell me about that. 

[00:34:55] Troy Hadeed: You know, when I talk about this, I really talk about our humanness and allowing everyone else their humanness. And I think this is important because we often want to allow ourselves humanness and understand that we will make mistakes.

[00:35:16] Troy Hadeed: Or for some people maybe not, but we fail to allow everyone else their humanness as well. And understand that we are all here. None of us are here because we have it figured out. If we had it figured out, we probably would not be in our physical body. To my understanding. And I think it’s important to allow our humanness, because I also connect this to accountability

[00:35:46] Troy Hadeed: We want more accountability in our world. We always talk about that, but yet we don’t create a space in which people feel comfortable being accountable. So every time somebody is accountable and says It was me, we hang them. We chastised them, we punish them. So who wants to be accountable? We’re not making accountability accessible.

[00:36:15] Troy Hadeed: To me, when someone steps into a place of accountability, it shows acknowledgement, it shows growth, it shows transformation. It should be applauded. You know, I could use an example here, Robert is, I have so much love and respect for Will Smith as a human being. He has from, at least from what I’ve known, always stepped into place of accountability and he’s always doing it work.

[00:36:43] Troy Hadeed: And he made this massive mistake and he owned it. But yet we’re still up to this day, I still hear so many people coming down on him for it. We all make these mistakes. All of us do. And there are times in our lives when all of us should have known better or did know better and we didn’t do better. And 

[00:37:09] Robert Hossary: I’m saying in a sense all of it now, you know, there’s a line of course, right? Because it doesn’t mean. We need laws and regulations Yep. To hold our society together. Yep. If you are inflicting harm upon someone and you don’t see that what you’re doing is wrong, then you need that needs there.

[00:37:33] Troy Hadeed: There’s certain punishment or regulation that needs to be enforced. Correct. So, not seeing we have a lawless society, but I am talking about relationships and this refers to celebrities who make mistakes like they’re human too. Right. And, It’s just so important. Like I, I’ve made some mistakes.

[00:37:54] Troy Hadeed: I’ve said some really foolish things. 

[00:37:57] Robert Hossary: Haven’t we all? 

[00:37:59] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. I would never want to be locked in a box. And labeled according to my mistake. Right. I’ve owned it, I’ve grown from it. But somebody can’t grow from their mistakes. Shame isn’t any way to do that. Maybe a little bit of shame momentarily, but, you know, by shaming someone, it doesn’t bring that growth.

[00:38:24] Troy Hadeed: And when someone steps into light and acknowledges they were wrong, you know, that takes so much power and we should applaud that. 

[00:38:35] Robert Hossary: Yes, absolutely. 

[00:38:38] Troy Hadeed: I love to describe it, Robert, as, think of the human experience as a curriculum. It’s like school. And each one of us have come to school, but we have, each one of us have a very individual curriculum to walk.

[00:38:55] Troy Hadeed: And while we are navigating our own curriculum and learning our own lessons, we are also writing someone else’s curriculum. So if I were to wrong you, Robert, that experience is for me to learn to overcome guilt and shame. But it’s also to teach you forgiveness and empathy and understanding. So we’re also intertwined in our curriculums are so intertwined that while we’re walking our own, our mistakes are actually setting a stage for someone else’s growth.

[00:39:36] Robert Hossary: What a wonderful way to put it. That’s great. I really like that. So, Let’s just move on to the next lesson because again, every one of these, Troy, we are gonna talk for hours.

[00:39:49] Lesson 8:Stop asking the question, “How can I change the world?” – Have the courage to ask, “How am I changing the world?” 

[00:39:49] Robert Hossary: Lesson number eight, stop asking the question, how can I change the world? Have the courage to ask the question, how am I changing the world?

[00:40:03] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. This one, I believe, comes from environmentalist Jane Goodall, which I think a lot of people are familiar with. And, it really hit home for me, you know, cuz growing up and as a child, I always wondered, how can I change the world? How can I change the world? And that seems so big. And if we have seven, 8 billion people on the planet asking, how can I change the world?

[00:40:27] Troy Hadeed: We’ll all be wondering, how can I change the world? You know, and asking a question, how am I changing the world now? It’s acknowledging, you know, we have this thing in our culture now where people wanna step into their power. Well, this is your power. Your power isn’t only being courageous and standing up for what you believe in.

[00:40:52] Troy Hadeed: Acknowledging your power is understanding that every word, every thought, and every action that we embody changes the world around us every single day. That we shift energy in a room, that we change perspectives, that we impact and affect people every single day in our lives. And we have to take responsibility for that and start to really look and ask you questions.

[00:41:24] Troy Hadeed: What impact am I having on people? And, you know, I did a corporate keynote speech for a company recently, and there their paper statement was Better Choices for Better World. And it’s an amazing company, but I pose the question to them, A better world for who? Because you can make better choices to create a better world for your families and your inner circles while having a negative impact on a larger collective.

[00:41:58] Troy Hadeed: So it’s essential that we really begin to dig into this and look at the impact of our actions and words and our thoughts, because we change the world every single day. And if we had 8 billion people looking at how we change the world every day in our lives, that’s how we actually change the world.

[00:42:19] Robert Hossary: Beautiful. This resonates with me a lot because I came across this thinking very recently in the last three or four years since I started working for an organization that helps people who are living with disabilities. That’s where I learned what real privilege was. 

[00:42:40] Robert Hossary: Yes. but also where I learned my purpose.

[00:42:42] Robert Hossary: I’ve since left there, I am now CEO of another organization that helps people with type one diabetes. 

[00:42:50] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:42:50] Robert Hossary: So again, it’s not about me. It’s about “how can I help the community? How can I make the world I live in a little better for everyone else?” 

[00:43:02] Troy Hadeed: Yeah.

[00:43:03] Robert Hossary: Do I succeed? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. But again, as you said, that’s what makes us all the same.

[00:43:09] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. And to, to link it back to the corporate world. Robert, here’s what I’ve realized. , because I think all your listeners need to acknowledge their power. And I’ve recently begun speaking in this corporate environment, and from my very first speaking engagement, I realized, wow, I realized how much of an influence corporate culture has on social culture.

[00:43:38] Robert Hossary: Yes. 

[00:43:39] Troy Hadeed: And for generations, corporate culture has always put profit above everything else. 

[00:43:46] Robert Hossary: Yes. 

[00:43:47] Troy Hadeed: So, no wonder it’s impacted social culture in that way. and profit is important. I’m not living in la la land, right? Profit means sustainability. It’s important, but we need to even outta scale, we need to put wellness and we need to look at, there’s certain things that should be put above profit.

[00:44:08] Troy Hadeed: Things like social impact, things like wellness. What are we contributing? And because if we can begin that shift in our corporate environment, that shift is gonna happen in our social world as well. 

[00:44:23] Robert Hossary: Agreed. Agreed. Let’s hope that happens sooner rather than later. Troy? 

[00:44:28] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:44:29] Lesson 9:cultivate a loving relationship with your mind

[00:44:29] Robert Hossary: Alright, let’s move on to lesson number nine.

[00:44:31] Robert Hossary: Now, I’ve gotta admit nine and 10 baffle me. So you are really gonna have to explain these. So lesson number nine, cultivate a loving relationship with your mind. Okay. What do you mean by that? 

[00:44:47] Troy Hadeed: You know, there’s a teaching in, it’s by a yoga teacher called B.K.S. Iyengar . He’s no longer in his body, but he used to say that in mind is king of everything.

[00:44:58] Troy Hadeed: So right now behind me, some people may not have a visual, but there’s a wooden wall. And if I told you the color of that wall was white, you would probably tell me I’m crazy because it’s actually like brown. But in reality, if I chose to believe that wall was white, then it was white. If I grew up believing that what color white and was always told that what color white, then you cannot change my mind unless I choose to believe differently.

[00:45:34] Troy Hadeed: The mind, Robert, is the most powerful thing we have. It changes our entire perception of the world. It changes our entire reality. Right. If someone came into this call or if you came into this call thinking I was a complete idiot and had no idea what I was saying or talking about, our conversation would be very different.

[00:46:01] Robert Hossary: Yes. 

[00:46:01] Troy Hadeed: Because you’ve already painted that narrative on me. And we label people with narratives, we label experiences with narratives, but we don’t always understand how powerful that narrative is, because the mind creates our reality in every way. And you know, recently, Robert, like after three months ago, I spent a period of time in absolute darkness.

[00:46:31] Troy Hadeed: And prior to that, I had spent a period in absolute silence, 10 days in silence. And I know what happens in mind, and I knew how powerful the mind is. But in darkness, I experienced things I could not even possibly imagine. Like I faced death. I never thought I would leave that room ever again. And it showed me how powerful the mind really is because right now I can see things around me.

[00:47:03] Troy Hadeed: There’s an aspect of reality and my perception of reality that can tell me that right now a missile is probably not going to fall on my house. Right? A tree maybe, but not a missile. but in darkness, there’s no perception of reality. In absolute darkness, you can’t see anything and there’s no one else around you.

[00:47:29] Troy Hadeed: So your mind becomes 100% the director of your reality, and it gives you a glimpse as to how powerful your mind really is. So whether someone chooses to believe the world is a bad place, or chooses to believe someone is a bad person, or chooses to believe an experience or a narrative of their life, or chooses to believe they’re sick and they’re ill and they’ll never get better, the things we say and we choose to believe, we are far more powerful than we realize.

[00:48:05] Troy Hadeed: Hmm. And we give those things so much more power when we choose to believe them. 

[00:48:11] Robert Hossary: So how do I cultivate a loving relationship with my mind then? 

[00:48:17] Troy Hadeed: All right. So I describe a relationship with her mind like a marriage, but it’s an eternal marriage. There’s no separation and there’s no divorce. It’s you and your mind forever.

[00:48:32] Troy Hadeed: Your mind is your ride or die. And like any relationship, Robert, for there to be a holistic loving relationship, there must be intimacy. And intimacy is just spending time with your partner trying to understand your partner. So this can resemble things like meditation maybe, and it’s so ironic cuz in a world today someone could say, yeah, I’m spending a day alone.

[00:49:03] Troy Hadeed: But yet they’re on Netflix, they’re on their devices, they’re reading, even reading books is not spending time alone. 

[00:49:09] Robert Hossary: Yeah. 

[00:49:10] Troy Hadeed: You’re, you’re still with an external influence, like to spend time with your mind is to sit with your mind, look at what comes up and listen to it and try to understand where these emotions and where these thoughts come from.

[00:49:27] Troy Hadeed: That is intimacy with your mind. And even if it’s three to five minutes a day, maybe how it begins, you just set your time on your phone, put it aside, and you sit with your mind and you look and listen to what your mind has to say. 

[00:49:44] Robert Hossary: I think that is wonderful advice. everything that I’ve been researching on, the different philosophies as well as, everything that we’ve heard about mindfulness, et cetera, all comes back to the fact that you have to understand yourself.

[00:50:01] Robert Hossary: And as you said, the most powerful part of yourself is your mind. 

[00:50:06] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. 

[00:50:06] Robert Hossary: So get to know your mind. Love it. no, that, that’s fantastic. Thank you, Troy. 

[00:50:11] Lesson 10:Breathing is not something we do, but something that is done to us

[00:50:11] Robert Hossary: Alright, well let’s move to the 10th and penultimate lesson because I’ve got one more question to ask you, but lesson number 10, this one again, baffled me.

[00:50:24] Robert Hossary: Breathing is not something we do, but something that is done to us now. I’m so , I’m sorry to laugh at this, Troy, but I have no clue what the hell that means. 

[00:50:38] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, I’m not surprised. Robert, before I answer that, I will say I want to finish. I told you about the teaching of B.K.S. Iyengar where he said the mind is king of everything, but that’s only half of the teaching.

[00:50:53] Troy Hadeed: His full teaching says, mind is king of everything, but breath is king of your mind. And one thing that helps us tame our mind and create this intimacy with our mind is our breath. Our breath is a king of our mind. It’s a king of our emotions. It’s a king of our reality. So it’s so important that people know and understand their breath.

[00:51:21] Troy Hadeed: But I learned to breathe at 27 years old, and that was three years after I had been teaching yoga. So I know for a fact that most people live their entire lives and don’t understand how breath works. And I will say this cuz I understand this could sound like mumbo jumbo, But we put so much emphasis on what we eat, how much exercise we get.

[00:51:49] Troy Hadeed: Even sleep is really important. But put this in perspective. We breathe 23,000 times a day and we can’t live more than three or four minutes without breathing. So what do you think has the most impact on our body of all? Breath is really important. And one of the first things any doctor should ask us is, how are you breathing?

[00:52:15] Troy Hadeed: Because they might ask, are you stressed? But breath controls your stress. Breath can dissolve stress. Very first question should be, how are you breathing? So I’ll get into this, I’ll get into it now. Robert, I’ve blah long enough. But the understanding that we don’t actually breathe, breath is breathing is something that is done to us.

[00:52:38] Troy Hadeed: Is the medical anatomy of breathing. This is not like some yoga Eastern philosophy perspective. This is medicine, right? If I were to ask you, when you breathe, do you pull air into your body? You would probably tell me yes as most listeners would. They would say, yes. When I inhale, I pull it into my body.

[00:53:01] Troy Hadeed: Well, that’s not actually accurate. Here’s how breath works, and your listeners are smart, so I’ll, I won’t spend too much time on this, but think of your thoracic cavity, which is from your diaphragm up to your sternum, which is where the majority of breath happens, right? . Think of that as a box. 

[00:53:20] Troy Hadeed: Inside that box has a set air pressure. When you expand the volume of that box, What happens? The air pressure, it goes down. Volume and air pressure inversely related. If you increase the volume of a space, the air pressure inside of it decreases, right? So when I expand my ribcage and my diaphragm descends into my belly, and my chest expands and my back body expands, these are only dimensions of breathing.

[00:53:54] Troy Hadeed: When I increase the volume of my thoracic cavity, the air pressure inside of me decreases. There’s also a law of physics that says that gasses move from high pressure to low pressure. This is not in question. So when I expand the volume of my thoracic cavity and the air pressure inside of me decreases, that means that the air pressure outside of me.

[00:54:21] Troy Hadeed: Is higher than the air pressure inside of me. So there’s that force. So I explain to people this way, there is an external force that breathes you, that pushes that air into you. All you have to do is create this space to receive it. And that might seem as insignificant, but it’s not. It changes your relationship to breath.

[00:54:48] Troy Hadeed: It also changes your relationship to everything and everyone around you, because the same force that breathes me, the same force that breathes you, even though you are on a different side of the world. And I also want to throw this in here, Robert, because it was very profound for me to learn that the word spirit, like Holy Spirit, actually comes from the Latin word spiritus.

[00:55:15] Troy Hadeed: That means to breathe. And it makes sense to me that there is some divine agency in our breath because it is the one thing that connects every living being in every bit of creation on the planet. The air molecules inside Of My right now, possibly we’re inside of you or will be inside of you at some point in your life.

[00:55:40] Troy Hadeed: If you, if I sit next to someone, we may not be genetically related or related by blood or related by opinion or perspective or ideology, but we are connected by air we breathe. Hence why the pandemic was such a big deal. 

[00:55:57] Robert Hossary: That’s deep. I mean, The scientific part of it aside, which is also fascinating, the fact that one, we’re connected. Yeah.

[00:56:05] Robert Hossary: Brings, it brings this full circle back to everything that we’ve talked about. But two, there’s not enough discussion, knowledge, practice about breathing because you’re right, it does reduce stress. 

[00:56:20] Robert Hossary: Yeah. It does clear the mind, it clarifies your thoughts. I hear you. I’m with you on that. I think we should take some time to understand how we breathe.

[00:56:32] Robert Hossary: And learn to breathe. Yeah. Purposefully. 

[00:56:36] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. Intentionally. 

[00:56:38] Robert Hossary: Intentionally. 

[00:56:40] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. I tell people intentional breathing is different from breathing. I think we take breath for granted because as soon as we come out of the womb, it arrives. So we’ve been taught to believe that breath is automatic and it is, thank God it is.

[00:56:55] Troy Hadeed: But there is a difference between breath being automatic and having a relationship and intimacy with breath. Yeah. Because when you create that intimacy with breath, you can now use that to alter emotional states. 

[00:57:10] Robert Hossary: and I have, yeah. And it does work. So I strongly advise anybody listening and watching.

[00:57:17] Robert Hossary: Make the time. Test it out. Yeah. Listen, Troy, he knows what he’s talking about 

[00:57:23] Troy Hadeed: in a, you know, in a corporate world too, Robert, what I like to point out is that the physical body and his spiritual body, emotional body are all connected, right? But when I get stressed, do I get anxiety?

[00:57:36] Troy Hadeed: The physical muscles of my body contract and my breath gets very fast. So if my physical body is in a state of contraction, Guess what? I can’t expand my body to create space, to receive breath, especially if I don’t know how breath works. . But if I have a relationship to my breath, I can use, all I need is two or three breaths, and I can use that to release the physical tension of my body and alter my emotional mental state.

[00:58:14] Robert Hossary: You can absolutely do that. I can attest to that. Troy, this has been absolutely wonderful. I, I’ve had the time of my life talking to you. Let me finish up by asking you one question. What have you unlearned? What have you had to unlearn?

[00:58:32] Troy Hadeed: Well, I hesitate to say I have unlearned it because I think I am still trying to unlearn it, and I think it’s just, I might be unlearning it until they leave my body. And this might sound very esoteric and very woo woo, woo, I’m not on, I’m not woo woo. woo. I like to believe I’m very tangible and real life.

[00:58:54] Troy Hadeed: but I am unlearning the narrative that this is my body. This is who I am, you know, from the day I was born, like all of us, I was told this is my body and my name is Troy. And I’ve learned that’s actually not true. That’s not a narrative I abide to because I believe that when I leave my body, There is life after death, whatever it is.

[00:59:22] Troy Hadeed: I believe that this conversation energetically will live in the minds and hearts of your listeners long after I leave my body, which means that the energy in which I’ve contributed a world will live forever. So in that way, we all have people who we love, who have left their bodies, who live with us, they aren’t dead.

[00:59:45] Troy Hadeed: They aren’t gone, they don’t cease to exist. So even to put a more tangible point to it, if I go tomorrow, and I change my name, am I still the person I am today? Yes. I just changed my name. Or if last year I weighed 300 pounds and I lost all this weight in a few years. Am I still the same person? Yes. I’ve just grown in certain ways.

[01:00:15] Troy Hadeed: So, and the problem with this, narrative of I am my body and my name’s Troy. What that does, Robert, is it makes us separate and this narrative that our entire world is built on. So whether we are conscious of it or not, let me put a hammer a nail in it here. As long as I believe I am my body and this is who I am. I am saying that when I leave my body, I will no longer exist.

[01:00:44] Troy Hadeed: And what I’m also doing is unconsciously maybe every decision I make and every choice I make will be governed by my need for self-preservation. Because as long as I am my body and this is all that I am and I will cease to exist, I will do everything that I possibly can to preserve my identity and who I think I am.

[01:01:12] Troy Hadeed: And as long as we identify with our individual form Robert, it inhibits our ability to love one another. And the more we can move beyond this attachment and this individual narrative is the closer we get to understanding unconditional love. 

[01:01:32] Robert Hossary: Troy, I can definitely say to you that’s the first time we have had that unlearned lesson on the show.

[01:01:41] Robert Hossary: It’s hard for a lot of people to grasp what you’re saying. Yeah. simply because society still doesn’t understand it. But yeah, as you said, we have very smart listeners and viewers, and I’m sure that you all heard what Troy said and you know, some of you have taken it to heart.

[01:02:01] Robert Hossary: Some of you are nodding furiously and agreeing with it, and some of you are saying, what the hell was he talking about? I get that Troy gets that. yeah, and that’s fine. That’s okay. Rewind this, listen to it again because this whole episode has been very deep. Troy, all I wanna say is thank you.

[01:02:20] Robert Hossary: Thank you for making the time to be on the show today. Thank you for being with us and sharing those fantastic lessons with us. 

[01:02:26] Troy Hadeed: thank you Robert. It’s been a pleasure and I honor just to be here and, thank you for giving me space and opportunity to share. 

[01:02:35] Robert Hossary: Anytime. Where can our listeners find you?

[01:02:38] Troy Hadeed: Yeah, so they can find me at https://troyhadeed.com/. That is my website. 

[01:02:44] Troy Hadeed: Yeah. And they can find me on Instagram and if anybody is interested in personal sessions or coaching or you know, about yoga or public speaking or would love to have me as a guest wherever, whenever, or have any questions at all, they can find me there.

[01:03:04] Troy Hadeed: And I would absolutely love to be a part of anything. Anything. 

[01:03:09] Robert Hossary: and we’ll finish here today. You’ve been listening to 10 Lessons Learned. Our guest today is Troy Hadeed, yoga teacher, social entrepreneur, and author, coming to us all the way from Trinidad and Tobago today. This episode is supported as always by the Professional Development Forum.

[01:03:30] Robert Hossary: please tell us what you think of today’s lessons. Leave us a comment, leave us a review. You can email us. You can send an email to podcast 10 lessons learned.com. That’s Podcast one zero lessons learned.com, and we’ll get back to you. We’d love to know what you thought of Troy’s lessons. We’d love to know what you think of the show.

[01:03:52] Robert Hossary: And if you have any other ideas for us, go ahead, hit that subscribe button and turn on your notification bell. Say you don’t miss an episode of the only show on the internet that changes the world, one lesson at a time. 

 This episode is produced by Robert Hossary. Sponsored as always by Professional Development Forum, which office insights, community or discussions, podcasts, parties, anything you want here, but they’re unique and it’s all free online. You can find the www.professionaldevelopmentforum.org you’ve heard from us we’d like to hear from you. Email us it’s podcast@10lessonslearned.com. Remember, this is the podcast the only podcast. That’s makes the world wiser lesson by lesson.

 

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Sangbreeta Moitra discusses why ”Personal branding elevates hard work”, why “A NO is merely an opinion”, why “A goal without...

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Rod Miller – Be interesting. Try something new.

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Rod Miller is an President, CEO, Founder and Strategics. He explains why we should “Put people first”, how “Everyone is...

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